NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Mountain people--North Carolina, Western
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4302
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over 4,000 full-or-part-time craftspersons live in economically depressed Western North Carolina. HandMade in America is a project that seeks to promote and preserve the crafts of this area and to transform the area into the nation's craft center. To assist in this project, promoters have produced a guidebook that directs people through the twenty-one county region, locating and describing points of interest, such as basket weaving or quilt making.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
25757
Author(s):
Abstract:
Graham County’s unemployment have more than tripled since 1975, giving the county the highest rate in North Carolina for the last year and a half. Now, at the height of tourist season, unemployment still hovers around 17 percent; in the winter months it has been topping 30 percent which is 10 times the Triangle’s unemployment rate. An increasing number of families are living below the poverty line. THE INDEPENDENT profiles the Buchanan clan that has lived in Graham County for more than a hundred years.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 5 Issue 15, August 13-26 1987, p1, 7-9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31486
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article describes Patsy Moore Ginns’ new book, Snowbird Gravy and Dishpan Pie: Mountain People Recall, and presents personal narratives about mountain living in North Carolina.
Source:
Record #:
35138
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is an excerpt from a book the author was currently working on, and dealt with her brief time spent in a mountain settlement, trying to separate folktale from truth.
Record #:
35883
Author(s):
Abstract:
The geographical characteristics of surroundings can often seem to impress themselves on the individual. People that lived in the mountains tended to be independent, stubborn, and had their own code of honor.