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5 results for MONITOR (Ship)
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Record #:
24619
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Abstract:
This article presents an eye-witness account of the famous wrecking event of the USS MONITOR (ship), one of the first iron-clad warships ever built, in the Diamond Shoals off Cape Hatteras. The account was originally in ‘Harper’s Weekly’ in 1863.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 4, July 1963, p9, 27, il
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Record #:
16084
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The Civil War ironclad Monitor was located on August 27, 1973 when researchers aboard the vessel Eastward found the remains fifteen miles south of Cape Hatteras. The discovery was only possible with the cooperative work between oceanographers, electronic engineers, and archaeologists.
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Record #:
30555
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On August 1, 1979 state archaeologists from the Division of Archives and History began the first of thirty-six lockout dives to perform engineering and archaeological assessments on and around the USS MONITOR. The Union ironclad sank of the coast of Cape Hatteras on December 31, 1862 due to a storm. Twenty additional observational dives were conducted with authorities from other related fields such as marine architecture, historic preservation, and ocean engineering and salvage.
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Record #:
30563
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On December 12, 1977 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued a memorandum of agreement to North Carolina's Division of Archives and History which gives research and assessment responsibilities to the NC State Historic Preservation Officer with in the MONITOR Marine Sanctuary. The Union ironclad USS MONITOR sank of the coast of Cape Hatteras on December 31, 1862 due to a storm.
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Record #:
31403
Author(s):
Abstract:
The ironclad warship U.S.S. Monitor sank off the North Carolina coast in 1862 while being towed to Beaufort for an attack on Wilmington. In 1973, researchers located the Monitor shipwreck southeast of Cape Hatteras. Follow-up expeditions resulted in the designation of the Monitor shipwreck as the nation’s first national marine sanctuary.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 6, June 1983, p8, il