NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Lumbering--History
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
14437
Abstract:
Lumbering used to be a dangerous, thrilling and strenuous operation, particularly during the days of poor highway and rail transportation, but conditions in recent years have changed.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 26, Nov 1947, p6-7, f
Full Text:
Record #:
16116
Author(s):
Abstract:
Herbert Nixon was interviewed for this article, specifically, to discuss the lumber industry in his home of Perquimans County. He recalled details about working for Major and Loomis Lumber Company, the largest in the county, during the 1930s.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 21 Issue 1, Fall 1981, p11-12, il
Full Text:
Record #:
1344
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beginning in the 1880s, logging railroads made large-scale logging operations possible. By around 1910, North Carolina was an important producer of lumber for the national market.
Full Text:
Record #:
36975
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the age of GPS devices, some tools introduced in the late 19th century are still tools of the trade for the lumbering industry around the world. Profiled and pictured are Caulk Boots, with spiked soles for traction and slippery surfaces; Pulaski Tool, with an ax on one side for chopping, a mattox on the other side for digging; and Biltmore Stick, used for calculating trees’ volume.