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14 results for Jack tales
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Record #:
35793
Abstract:
In this article, the author seeks to outline the phase of Jack’s characterization where he appears as a typical Märchen hero. He is typically abused, the youngest and least esteemed child, who exploits in the world allows him to return home to recognition that was previously denied.
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Record #:
35786
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An introduction for four stories about Jack Tales, which are a subgenre of folklore that always center on the character “Jack,” the hero.
Record #:
35791
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Starting with a brief biography of Mr. Ward, the author then describes his writing style and the impact he had on the genre.
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Record #:
35792
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The central theme of W.H. Ward’s writing style is unity and repetition, which gives his stories a sense of fullness and suspense.
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Record #:
35787
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A story about how Jack devised a way to make lots of money, and get rid of his mean brothers.
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Record #:
35789
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A story about how Jack stole three steers for a gang of robbers, who then paid him for his service.
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Record #:
35788
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A story about how Jack was taken in by a cat, which was under a witch’s spell.
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Record #:
35831
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Beginning with a brief biography of Ray Hicks and how he began telling Jack tales, the author recorded three tales, “The Doctor’s Daughter/Jack and the Robbers,” “The Cat and the Mouse,” and “Lucky and Unlucky Jack.”
Record #:
35900
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This story examines the performance paradigm of Stanley Hicks, a traditional instrument maker from Bethel community in Watauga County, NC. He told Jack tales for entertainment value, not monetary gain. Hicks’ was a folk authority and his conviction that the art of storytelling is acquired rather than innate.
Record #:
35930
Abstract:
In Appalachian Jack tales, Jack is a fool or laughingstock, but still the hero of the story. The types of major types of Jack tale can be divided into seven contests: nursery rhyme, fool tale, trickster tale, wonder tale, tall tale, adult fool/trickster tale (fabliau), and culture hero, all of which the author included examples of.
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Record #:
35966
Abstract:
By extending his familial oral narratives to the contemporary revival scent of folktales, Donald Davis made himself a creative artist that moved outside the boundaries of folk traditions. In order to portray the tales that he told, it was necessary to set them in the context of Davis’s family background, personal experiences, and storytelling practices.
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Record #:
36359
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In memorium to Ray Hicks, the authors recall his famous storytelling abilities, especially regarding jack tales.