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11 results for Historic preservation--North Carolina
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Record #:
5215
Abstract:
The Endangered Properties Program of Preservation North Carolina, started in 1976, is marking twenty-five years of success in 2001. It oversaw the country's first statewide revolving fund dedicated to saving endangered historic properties. Over 500 properties have been directly saved; hundreds of others have been preserved. Pages 4-47 of this issue highlight the twenty-five years of one of the nation's best-known preservation programs.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 120, Fall-Winter 2001, p1-47, il
Record #:
18822
Abstract:
Due to a unique public and private partnerships initiated by the North Carolina, the state's historically significant architectural heritage may have a better chance of surviving. Municipal and commercial interests will seek to breathe new life into North Carolina communities by matching potential investors with development opportunities that are encouraged to rehabilitate and use historic properties.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 49, Apr 1984, p1, 10, f
Record #:
18847
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1980, the North Carolina Main Street Program has been working with selected cities to bring new life to their downtowns. Focusing on revitalization within the context of historic preservation, the program has demonstrated over the years the effectiveness of such an approach in the state.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 53, Oct/Nov 1984, p3, f
Record #:
18863
Author(s):
Abstract:
Short for the Association of North Carolina Revolving Fund, ARF is the only unique statewide association of preservation groups that actively acquire historic properties in order to save them.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 63, May/June 1986, p1-2, f
Record #:
18911
Author(s):
Abstract:
J. Myrick Howard, Executive Director of Preservation North Carolina, details the roller coaster of 1993 for North Carolina historic preservation.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 92, Spring 1994, p2-4, f
Record #:
18942
Abstract:
With the impending elections, Preservation North Carolina posed questions relating to historic preservation in the state to the candidates for governor and lieutenant governor.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 117, Fall 2000, p1-3, 8, f
Record #:
18938
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the growth of urban sprawl in North Carolina, Howard discusses how historic preservation can make smarter growth in the state even smarter.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 113, Fall 1999, p1-3, f
Record #:
18943
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some of North Carolina's modern architecture is considered to be of international, historical and architectural, significance. However, many of these structures are in danger, so preservationists are rushing to prevent the loss of a unique part of cultural history.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 118, Winter 2000, p1-2, f
Record #:
18970
Abstract:
Recently, the western office of North Carolina State Historic Preservation joined representatives from the Historic Burke Foundation and former residents of Henry River Mill Village to discuss the process of listing the property on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Full Text:
Record #:
28691
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sunset Park, a suburb of Wilmington, North Carolina, has a diverse architectural range of houses from 1912 to the 1960s. Preservation in Sunset Park can be seen in the homes that still retain their historical integrity, and the streets which are laid out in much the same way as the developer platted them in 1912.
Source:
Lower Cape Fear Historical Society Bulletin (NoCar F 262 C2 L6x), Vol. 52 Issue 2, March 2009, p1-7, il, por, bibl, f
Full Text:
Record #:
30542
Abstract:
A call for the use of full historic restorations and the development of House Museums in a time where these practices are declining. This article suggests "adaptive use" has its place, but for some unique historic examples, compromise in use and structural change should be avoided. When a historic site is adapted for modern use the building's historic character is often overlooked.