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5 results for Environmentalists
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Record #:
16047
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Abstract:
Historical accounts as far back as ancient times reveal methods of harvesting rainwater for reuse. A new trend among environmentally conscientious residents is rainwater harvesting in backyards into barrels or cisterns. A workshop was held in Onslow County last year that drew 70 interested individuals. Further work was undertaken by Mark McCloskey, vice president of East Carolina Community Development Inc., in Jacksonville where a green-friendly apartment complex, called Glenstal, incorporates a 1,100 gallon cistern for the community to repurpose.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2012, p17-21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1775
Abstract:
Tom Quay, retired professor of zoology and wildlife conservation at North Carolina State University, has left a profound legacy to the modern environmental movement.
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Record #:
28363
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Abstract:
A small Chapel Hill environmental group called the Student Environmental Action Coalition has become a national coalition of 30,000 students. The group deals with issues that affect the natural environment, and also issues that affect the man-made environment. At the group’s national conference, the environmentalists were encouraged to confront issues of race, class, and social justice. This mindset and other details behind how the group has expanded from a small, Chapel Hill to a large, nationwide group are explored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 7, February 1992, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
29725
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilma Dykeman’s first book, The French Broad, was published seven years before Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring. Dykeman’s book is widely credited for bringing needed attention to the polluted state of the French Broad River and its tributary, the Pigeon River. The Center for Cultural Preservation and the Wilma Dykeman Legacy will present a program honoring her work in Western North Carolina.
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Record #:
40416
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two decades before Rachel Carson became a pioneer for the environmentalist movement, she laid the foundation for marine biologists through her work at a trio of islands south of Beaufort. In addition to the landmark Silent Spring is the perhaps lesser known first book, Under the Sea Wind, inspired by her experiences at Carrot, Town Marsh, and Bird Shoal.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 1, June 2019, p128-132, 134, 136 Periodical Website