NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


31 results for Education--Finance
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
29082
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nine-million dollars in annual tax cuts passed by the North Carolina legislature has caused local governments to raise taxes to better fund schools. Critics argue that the budget shortchanges students while enriching the wealthy. Proponents argue that the budget will dramatically increase teacher pay and improve public education outcomes.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 25, July 2017, p6, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
27748
Author(s):
Abstract:
The cost of putting an armed officer in every school in Wake County is explored after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Connecticut. Adding an officer in all of the county’s 169 schools would cost the district 13.5 million dollars. Currently, the district only has 54 officers in schools and the pros and cons of increasing the number of officers is discussed.
Source:
Record #:
30383
Author(s):
Abstract:
Financial literacy education is starting to become a better-known topic within our North Carolina public school systems. A few bills have been passed requiring education curriculum to incorporate general economics, money management, savings and investment, and general banking procedures. With better financial management skills, there may be fewer bankruptcies and foreclosures, and lower consumer debt.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 91 Issue 4, Winter 2012, p54-55, il
Record #:
27931
Author(s):
Abstract:
The budget crisis is affecting Durham Public Schools. Durham may lose twenty million in state and local funds which should cost the district as many as 323 jobs, including 237 teaching positions. Carla Brown talks about being told she will lose her job as a teacher at Northern High School in the summer. Class sizes will increase and teacher training will be reduced if the school loses its funding. The school board has asked the county commissioners for funding to save teachers’ jobs, but the city is planning cuts for all departments.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 20, May 2010, p5, 9 Periodical Website
Record #:
27953
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wake County School Board members are spending more time worrying about eliminating diversity than working on the budget. The new budget will eliminate forty jobs and will not request more funding despite opening four new schools and an increase in enrollment. Spending per student has decreased and will continue to decrease over the next two years. Some believe that the board is trying to make up for the decreases by creating low-income schools and relying on social programs to help fund them.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 23, June 2010, p9 Periodical Website
Record #:
18836
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's financial aid largely focused on students entering traditional four-year programs with less emphasis on those individuals entering community colleges. The author offers a statistical breakdown for the number of community college students and aid received. Sources for this funding is also explored, showing that much of the community college students receive federal funding and less state funding. Six sources of state funding are highlighted and the author encourages development of such programs like the Need-Based Teaching and Nursing Grant Program and how to enhance these for community college students.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
30271
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Council on Economic Education continues its core mission promoting economic education and personal financial literacy through a variety of educational programs. New members of the council are working to develop personal financial literacy programs in public schools, as mandated by recent state legislation.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 86 Issue 4, Winter 2007, p19, por
Record #:
5196
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Guilford County School Board challenged the Guilford County Commissioners over the amount of funding for the school system, because it was below the school board's request. The dispute was settled August 4, 2000. Wilson discusses what other school boards with similar disputes can learn from Guilford County's experience.
Source:
School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 32 Issue 2, Spring 2001, p1-10, il
Full Text:
Record #:
5480
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1994, a group of poor school districts filed a lawsuit against the state, charging failure to provide sufficient funding to educate their students. The North Carolina Supreme Court's ruling recognized that under the state constitution children have a right to a \"sound basic education.\" Coll examines three extensive superior court rulings on this right and how the state's educational future might be affected by them.
Source:
School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 32 Issue 3, Summer 2001, p1-21, il, f
Full Text:
Record #:
4474
Author(s):
Abstract:
With population growth outstripping their budgets, some school systems are trying new ways to raise money. Rowan and Burke counties have contracted with Coca-Cola and Pepsi respectively for exclusive rights to sell their products in the schools. The schools get needed funds for items like textbooks, scoreboards, and computers. Some school personnel question the commercialization, possible influence on curriculums by companies, and competition with the food service program.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 58 Issue 2, Feb 2000, p8-9, il
Record #:
4383
Author(s):
Abstract:
Section 115C-431 of the North Carolina General Statutes lays out the procedure for resolving a dispute between a local board of education's request for more operating funds than the local county commissioners are willing to meet. Powell discusses the law's development from the pre-1920 statutes, through the statutes of 1923, 1955, 1975, 1989, 1996, and 1997.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4380
Abstract:
In 1997, the North Carolina General Assembly revised General Statute 115C-431, the law governing budget disputes between local boards of education and county commissioners. The use of mediation procedures was adopted. Stephens and Michel discuss and analyze this process in handling school funding disputes in Lee, Pamlico, and Wake Counties in 1997.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
3439
Abstract:
While the state has the responsibility to provide a general and uniform free public school system and local government to provide financial support, school units are not equal because of inadequate and inequitable funding.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
2327
Author(s):
Abstract:
With over 20,000 new students entering the state's schools systems each year for the next decade, school personnel, local officials, and state legislators are challenged by two issues: the critical need for new school buildings and how to pay for them.
Source:
Record #:
2513
Abstract:
In May, 1994, the school boards of Cumberland, Halifax, Hoke, Robeson, and Vance Counties filed a lawsuit against the state, charging failure to provide sufficient funding to educate their students.
Source:
North Carolina Law Review (NoCar K14 0694), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Sept 1995, p2123-2188, f
Subject(s):