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4 results for Dams--Design and construction
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Record #:
13058
Abstract:
The long, curving, stone dam separating the river from ocean between Federal Point and Baldhead Island, was completed in 1881, closing the inlet, which was opened during a storm in 1761. Designed by Mr. Henry Bacon, the New Inlet Dam allowed waterborne commerce to flourish by eliminating shoals and allowing a deeper channel from the larger volume of water. The Dam was capped with cement later on and is now considered a fisherman's paradise. The Dam was also extended south past Corncake Inlet some years later.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 3, July 1955, p8, 14, f
Full Text:
Record #:
9539
Author(s):
Abstract:
Controversy swirls around the construction of the B. Everett Jordan Dam. Over 44,000 acres are involved in this U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project. Some of the finest wildlife habitat and farm land in the Piedmont, in addition to a prime whitewater stretch on the Haw River and most of New Hope Creek, are in the area. This article contains views on the building of the dam.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
31392
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new concept in water management may lead to improved water usage on millions of acres of cropland in North Carolina. A research project is testing to see if the Mitchell Swamp Canal of the Conetoe Creek Water District can be made to double as a water reservoir. The project will install a new inflatable dam called Fabridam to control the water level in the canal.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 3, Mar 1983, p43, il
Record #:
34292
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has seventy-four small watershed dams that are an average of thirty-years old. The dams are generally in good condition, but many of them need maintenance and minor repairs which can easily become larger problems if left unattended. Forty-two-percent of the dams have been classified as having a high hazard potential, meaning that, in the event of a breach, there could be significant economic loss, environmental damage, or disruption to lifeline services.