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11 results for Christmas tree growing
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Record #:
82
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North Carolina provides about 15% of the nation's Christmas trees, making it the third-largest Christmas tree producing region in the nation. The growing popularity of the Fraser fir, a variety indigenous to North Carolina, should increase the market share in the future.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 7, Dec 1991, p26-28, il
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Record #:
4408
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The state's Christmas tree farms produce 35 million trees, and the industry contributes $6.5 million to the state's economy. Even after the holidays are over, the trees can be used for constructing coastal shore fish habitats, building bird houses, and providing a source for wood chips.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 12, Dec 1999, p6, il
Record #:
4972
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Phytopthora, a fungus which thrives in warm, moist soils, caused the 1840s Irish potato famine. Unknown in North Carolina ten years ago, the fungus, benefiting from mild mountain winters, has launched an attack on the Fraser fir, a prime tree in the state's Christmas tree industry. Already 7 percent, or 400,000, of the state's six million trees are affected. Experts predict the worst is yet to come.
Record #:
10317
Abstract:
Growing Christmas trees is a new business developing in North Carolina. This article presents points to consider before going into the growing business.
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Record #:
11738
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Nationwide the Christmas trees are a $300 million industry. In North Carolina, 900,000 trees will be harvested in 1977 and bring about $10 million on the retail level. This article contains information on who grows Christmas trees, where they are grown, and how the business operates.
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Record #:
25381
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Abstract:
With disease spreading through the Christmas tree industry in Western North Carolina and a need for a new cash crop in the Eastern part of the state, researchers are working on developing a genetically modified version of the trees to benefit all growers in North Carolina.
Record #:
30361
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Along the slopes of Roan Mountain, North Carolina, a new industry is growing. Balsam Fir Christmas trees from the North Carolina National Forest in the Toecane Ranger District are being sent to markets across the United States.
Record #:
30694
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In the high-altitude forests of western North Carolina, it is harvest season for mountain greenery. North Carolina is the source for Christmas trees and half a dozen species of smaller evergreens.
Record #:
31177
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There is green, bushy gold in the North Carolina mountains, estimated to be a $60 million business nationally and $15 million for the state. As of yet, North Carolina has not tapped the potential market in Christmas trees, but there are over 300 growers in the state, representing a 100% increase in the past four years. Thousands of Fraser firs, white pines, red cedars, and other species are being planted this spring to reap the returns come winter.
Record #:
34833
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Larry Smith, Grand Champion of the 2017 National Christmas Tree Contest, will be choosing the tree that is set up in the White House for 2018. His farm is located in Avery County, and he has been growing Christmas trees since the 1970’s, turning it into a lucrative family business.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p88-94, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34830
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Justice family farm in Jacksonville, North Carolina is home to one of the last Christmas tree farms in the state. Since 1984, Willie Justice, the head proprietor, has helped families find the perfect tree and along the way, made lifelong friends and customers.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p28-30, il, por Periodical Website
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