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15 results for Beavers
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Record #:
1488
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beavers, once eradicated by trapping, have made a dramatic comeback and now present landowners and officials with a dilemma: how to control the population so that such benefits as soil conservation outweigh widespread flooding and other damage.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 59 Issue 3, Winter 1994, p18-23, il, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
3482
Abstract:
Nearly gone by the 20th century, beavers were reintroduced in the state in the 1930s and spread across the counties. They are a gnawing concern to the timber industry, but a boon to Paul Dobbins of Princeton, one of the state's last full-time trappers.
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Record #:
14458
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Abstract:
In 1939, the North Carolina Department of Conservation and Development moved twenty-seven Pennsylvania beavers to the Camp McCall reservation near Hoffman in Richmond County. Five years later, they were found in five different places in Quewhiffle Township, Hoke County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 36, Feb 1948, p3-5, 22, f
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Record #:
16950
Abstract:
The return of beavers to streams in Guilford County has encountered widely different responses in rural and urban landscape context. Some view the beaver as a positive agent of stream restoration, while others seem them as a public nuisance.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 11 Issue , 2003, p1-9, bibl
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Record #:
25273
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Charlie Thomas reflects on the good and bad things beavers do for the environment and how a cooperative program may help find the balance between beavers and humans.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2003, p6, il
Record #:
26684
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beavers originally were found over all of North Carolina, but in early days were trapped and hunted until they were near eliminated. Preliminary results from a statewide survey show that beavers are rapidly expanding their range.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 32 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1985, p4
Subject(s):
Record #:
6601
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1897, the state's last native beavers were trapped in Stokes County. Several unsuccessful attempts to reintroduce beavers were made in the early 20th century. However, in 1939, 29 beavers from Pennsylvania were released in the Sandhills Wildlife Management Area near Rockingham. By 1949, 385 beavers were counted. Wildlife biologists do not expect beavers to spread over the state from this nucleus.
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Record #:
6636
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Abstract:
Once estimated at several hundred thousand in colonial North Carolina, the beaver was extinct across the state by the late 19th-century. In 1938, 29 beavers were released on what is now the Sandhills Wildlife Management Area in Richmond County. In 1955, the estimated beaver population was around 5,000. Wilson discusses the history of the beaver in North Carolina and its effect on the landscape.
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Record #:
9798
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beavers have made a dramatic comeback since the last recorded native beaver in the state was caught in 1897 in Stokes County. An unsuccessful attempt was made to reintroduce the beaver in 1932 near Asheville, but in 1939, a release of twenty-nine beavers in the Sandhills was successful.
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Record #:
26893
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Problems associated with beavers in North Carolina are caused by the flooding of fields or timber. However, farmers can control flooded areas by installing a water-level control device to create a beaver pond and wildlife habitat. Beaver ponds also control siltation and serve as water reservoirs that can recharge depleted underground water supplies.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p12-13, il
Record #:
5151
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beavers remake the environment to meet their needs. What's good for the beaver, though, sometimes causes problems for people, such as destruction of trees and crops and flooding caused by beaver dams. On the positive side, beaver ponds provide homes for waterfowl and habitats for other species including frogs and bitterns. The dams also help prevent harmful nutrients and pollutants from washing downstream by causing them to settle to the pond bottoms where bacteria destroy them.
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Record #:
11452
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Beavers were brought back from the brink of extinction in the state when they were reintroduced in the Sandhills in the late 1930s. Today they have spread across the state and are thriving. They are also a good news/bad news proposition. What's good for the beaver isn't always good for people, like flooding land and destroying trees. On the other hand, their ponds provide waterfowl habitats and homes for other species.
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Record #:
26763
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Beaver complaints are increasing as beaver populations expand into new territory. The North Carolina Trappers Association helped to establish a new program to assist landowners with control of beavers which cause damage to forestry and agriculture.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1983, p16
Subject(s):
Record #:
26811
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaver populations are increasing throughout the state and nation. Anglers are concerned about beaver damage to trout streams because they build dams that change water levels and flow. This can also flood roadways and plug culverts.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 5, May 1981, p11-12, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
29525
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Abstract:
Beavers, nature's architects, sculpt the landscape to fit their needs. Now, North Carolina Sea Grant researchers are examining the beavers' plans to help restore the state's wetlands.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2017, p14-18, por Periodical Website