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4 results for Art and society--Greenville
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Record #:
24813
Author(s):
Abstract:
Vik Sexton, a Greenville artist, presents fun but creepy sculptures made of clay. She has developed her own unique way of painting them to give them a more matte appearance and to make any color she wants. Her pieces include ‘Terror-Dactyls,’ Franklin heads, and a piece entitled the ‘Worst Toy Ever.’ Sexton has been working with clay since she was a small child and has been taking her work to shows for years.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p29-36, il, por
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Record #:
24812
Author(s):
Abstract:
Greenville local Harvey Wooten’s home will be included on the Artist Studio Tour on Saturday, Nov. 1 due to its extensive amount of art. Wooten has placed art throughout her home everywhere from the foyer to the laundry room and collects anything and everything one might consider art. The art is a collection of mostly others pieces, but includes some by her sister, grandson, and herself.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p16-27, il, por
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Record #:
23404
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rachel Maxwell Moore (1890-1964) was from Resaca community, near Kenansville, NC, but moved to Greenville after meeting and marrying James H. B. Moore of Greenville in 1922. She promoted the arts in Greenville and helped found the East Carolina Art Society and Greenville Museum of Art, receiving many awards for her efforts. She was a leading civic figure and Woman’s Club leader throughout her life. Rachel Maxwell Moore died of lung cancer on December 30, 1964. In her will, she established the Rachel Maxwell Moore Foundation, and stipulated that her house was to be sold and the money used to purchase art for the Greenville Museum.