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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Aquaculture
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Record #:
27334
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The NC Sea Grant program is using story maps to explain oyster aquaculture and oyster reef restoration due to building interest across the state. The article explains the benefits of protecting oysters and encouraging their habitat for the health of the state’s ecosystem and the potential economic benefit of harvesting oysters.
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Record #:
18261
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About half the fish consumed worldwide is produced by aquaculture. Production includes rainbow trout, oysters, hybrid striped bass, prawns, and flounder. Smith visits some of the innovative growers around the state.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2012, p6-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25079
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The 22nd North Carolina Aquaculture Development met in January to discuss different needs of different professionals and investors. There were several presentations as well as vendors promoting new products that could help fish farmers.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2010, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28386
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Cylindrotheca closterium is a diatom commonly found in neritic waters of the Newport River estuary in North Carolina. This study measured diatom growth rates and motility. The results have implications for using diatoms in a variety of biotechnological and commercial applications that would require industrial-scale production including abalone culture.
Record #:
8554
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Leutze continues his series on coastal aquaculture by discussing two different, but successful, programs. One is a large-scale project at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. The program began in 1998 under the direction of Dr. Wade Watanabe, a research professor at UNCW's Center for Marine Science. Watanabe coordinates the center's aquaculture programs. The other program is smaller and was started by Jeff Wolfe, an enterprising local fisherman.
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Record #:
8306
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Lutze discusses fish faming and its impact on coastal North Carolina.
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Record #:
6887
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Seeking to diversify his livestock business, which produces 110,000 hogs a year in Bailey, R. C. Hunt chose aquaculture. Seven years ago he opened Southern Farms Tilapia, which at the time was the state's first tilapia hatchery. The farm is now among the country's top five in tilapia production and will produce two million pounds in 2004.
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Record #:
4939
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Flounder is a popular food fish; however, a number of areas have been overfished, and some North Carolina waters have been closed. A flounder aquaculture has been profitable in Asia for a number of years. Korea is producing around twenty-one million tons a year. Researchers with the North Carolina Sea Grant program anticipate there will be commercial flounder production in the state in the next three to five years.
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Record #:
4938
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With tobacco support declining in the state, a number of farmers in the east explore ways to diversify their operations. Aquaculture is one that shows promise. In 1999, this economic sector totaled $17 million in revenues. Mosher examines how this new \"crop\" is developing around the state.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2001, p17-18, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25692
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With the success of the $3.5 million farm-raised striped bass industry, collaborative researchers at East Carolina University are turning their focus to southern flounder.
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Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 1998, p14-15 Periodical Website
Record #:
3419
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With flounder harvests declining over 100 million pounds between 1984 and 1995, North Carolina Sea Grant scientists are developing a flounder aquaculture to supplement flounder caught in the wild.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Summer 1997, p8-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
16878
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Economic Development has largely bypassed much of the rural coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina. Few industries requiring skilled workers and paying high wages have been attracted to the region. To increase development in this region, it is imperative that new economic activities be put in place. These activities must be compatible with the natural and cultural resources of the region. One such activity that many believe has significant potential to enhance economic development is aquaculture, especially catfish farming.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p55-61, bibl
Record #:
19390
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When it comes to shellfish, people want in on the act, and clam and oyster culture in North Carolina claim more adherents than any other aquaculture combined.
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Record #:
19389
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The popularity of catfish outside the South is quickly catching fire, and with it North Carolina's production of aquaculture-grown catfish.
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Record #:
19235
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Scientists have long manipulated genetics to develop hybrids of plants to make more and better food for Americans. Now they are applying genetic manipulation on fish and are looking to improve the commercial and recreational fisheries of striped bass.
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