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8 results for Annexation (Municipal government)
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Record #:
387
Author(s):
Abstract:
The General Assembly grapples with annexation laws that are outdated and controversial in an attempt to assign specific powers to the cities and to the citizens involved in an annexation.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Apr 1981, p27-33, il
Full Text:
Record #:
2861
Abstract:
Cities are required by statute to provide utilities to annexed areas. However, they have the discretion to consider factors like remoteness of a person asking for service and cost of service extension when granting or refusing service requests.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 73, May 1996, p1-6, f
Record #:
3559
Abstract:
The 1997 General Assembly passed a number of environmental laws, including one to reduce nutrient levels in some rivers. Several bills were proposed that would have weakened a city's annexation authority, but none passed.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 47 Issue 8, Sept 1997, p1,4-5, il
Record #:
5528
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hot issues such as taxes and annexation, along with an anti-incumbency mood in state politics, have been the impetus for challenges to the common council/manager type of local government throughout the state.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 43 Issue 12, Dec 1993, pp1,8-9
Record #:
17001
Abstract:
During the last four decades of the 20th-century North and South Carolina experienced rapid population growth and significant development in metropolitan centers. Although the metropolitan population growth outstripped all other in both states, the distribution within these centers was strikingly different; this may be linked to different legislation provisions on annexation incorporation and special district formation in the two states.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 16 Issue , 2008, p5-23, map, bibl, f
Record #:
18521
Author(s):
Abstract:
Prompted by the North Carolina League of Municipalities and the Association of County Commissioners, the General Assembly's Legislative Research Commission reviewed 1959 legislation concerning municipal annexation. Despite opposition, the commission reported the state's annexation laws to be lawful and reasonable but cautioned officials to use with care and thoughtfulness. Many still regarded the state's laws to be a sound plan both locally and nationally.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 47 Issue 3, Winter 1982, p31-35
Record #:
22538
Author(s):
Abstract:
Forced annexation of communities which already provide for their own needs and are opposed to the annexation is merely an extension of urban sprawl by governments which cannot manage their budgets effectively. Though legal in North Carolina, the forced annexation of Biltmore Lake into Asheville is a classic example of this phenomenon.
Record #:
22537
Author(s):
Abstract:
Annexation is a necessary tool used to make sure that the expensive costs of municipal services are shared by all that benefit from them. Asheville is a perfect example.