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9 results for Air--Pollution
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Record #:
2171
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's major pulp, paper, and mining industries are making a concerted effort to control pollution and improve the environment. Champion International now releases cleaner water into the Pigeon River, facilitating the river's recreational use.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 3, Mar 1995, p12-17, il
Record #:
3170
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ozone-laden urban smog and acid rain are a threat to the Appalachian Mountains, as evidenced by damaged forests on Clingman's Dome and Mount Mitchell. The tightening of ozone standards is vital if the mountains are to be protected.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Winter 1997, p3,5, il
Record #:
4642
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a move to reduce its air pollution, Hickory is building a state-of-the-art natural gas refueling station. A number of city vehicles will convert to natural gas. When the station is completed in the year 2000, it will have the capacity to refuel over 100 vehicles a day and will be the state's largest natural gas refueling station. The station will be available to the public as well as other governmental agencies.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 58 Issue 6, June 2000, p10, il
Record #:
5613
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three NC counties, Forsyth, Durham, and Wake, were determined to be exceeding allowable carbon monoxide levels; therefore, these and surrounding counties were required to sell only oxygenated fuel. Vogt evaluates how this mandate affects CO levels.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 80, Jan 1994, p1-6
Record #:
26569
Author(s):
Abstract:
Volatile chemical losses are believed to threaten clean air. A new research project aimed at reducing volatile chemical losses has been launched as part of the EPA Center for Waste Minimization and Management, established at North Carolina State University by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1989, p6
Record #:
170
Author(s):
Abstract:
Our trout streams are on the brink of disaster due to polluted air, not polluted water.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
27019
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are federal proposals to raise gasoline taxes to diminish excessive use of cars and thereby help reduce pollution. According to Secretary Jim Harrington, with all these pollution problems, God and highways seem like odd bedfellows; but in North Carolina, people love the freedom automobiles seem to provide.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Mar 9-22 1989, p14-17, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27509
Author(s):
Abstract:
Last February, the state Environmental Management Commission adopted regulations to control 105 toxic air pollutants. This should reduce our exposure to toxic chemicals through air pollution. However, the state lacks money to implement the protection program and rules allow businesses to petition and avoid compliance. These problems and loopholes may see little actual change in air quality over time.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 50, December 12-18 1990, p8-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
34308
Author(s):
Abstract:
In November, the United States Environmental Protection Agency proposed a rule for dealing with radon in drinking water. Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that may cause cancer, and may be found in drinking water and indoor air. Due to the expensive costs of radon removal from drinking water, the North Carolina Public Water Supply Section is considering the development of a multimedia radon mitigation program to focus on removing radon from indoor air.