NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


42 results for "Tobacco industry"
Currently viewing results 31 - 42
Previous
PAGE OF 3
Record #:
29338
Author(s):
Abstract:
Anti-tobacco sentiment has risen since cigarette smoking was blamed for thousands of deaths each year. This year the federal government made substantive reductions in its support for tobacco, which has had tremendous economic, political, and cultural importance in North Carolina. Despite this, state politicians and tobacco spokesmen have responded with little protest.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 5, May 1981, p12-59, il, por
Record #:
30104
Author(s):
Abstract:
It has been suggested that the cigarette shortage is due to a shortage in cigarette leaf tobacco. Developers argue however, that the shortage is due to a lack of manpower rather than shortages in the flue-cured or burley leaf tobacco.
Record #:
30233
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the past two years the North Carolina State Ports Authority has seen a substantial increase in the number of shipping lines calling at Wilmington for containerized tobacco. This new traffic is credited to efforts by the tobacco industry itself.
Source:
Cargo (NoCar HE 554 N8 C36x), Vol. 17 Issue 2, 2nd Quarter 1992, p13-14
Record #:
31190
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center in Asheville, North Carolina is the nation’s first “marketing center,” returning to the traditional tobacco warehouse auction system. In addition to allowing the auction, the center’s project also pays warehouse, grading and assessment fees, and other marketing fees typically paid by growers.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Feb 2002, p22-23, por
Record #:
31233
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Mike Easley describes his life growing up on his family’s tobacco farm in Nash Count. Easley also discusses the recent tobacco settlement, rural North Carolina, education, economic development, and the electric utility industry.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 11, Nov 2001, p16-19, por
Record #:
31314
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s congressional delegation, along with members from other tobacco producing states, will be trying to cash in some green stamps this year as they try to save the federal tobacco program. Federal support of the tobacco industry is being criticized for the negative effects of tobacco on health, and faces competition with foreign markets and imported tobacco leaves.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 3, Mar 1985, p20-21, il
Record #:
31416
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina members of Congress have been working to save the government program that gives a support price to the tobacco leaf when it is marketed. Changes are being made to freeze the support price on the 1983 crop at the 1982 level, and to phase out allotment leasing. This would have a drastic effect on North Carolina small farms.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 8, Aug 1983, p24-25, il
Record #:
31648
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seventh District Representative Charles G. Rose of Fayetteville believes North Carolina tobacco farmers are not getting a fair share in the market place, and he’s supporting efforts to change that situation. In an interview, Rose discusses the Congressional Rural Caucus, rural development, tobacco allotments, and import tariffs on foreign tobacco.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 9, Sept 1975, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
31659
Author(s):
Abstract:
United States Senator Sam Ervin discusses the importance of North Carolina agriculture and identifies developments that threaten it. Ervin also highlights important business and trade elements that provide services to sustain farm operations, and the state’s flue cured tobacco market.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, Mar 1974, p6-7, il
Record #:
38219
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several factors were attributed to business booming between North Carolina’s Southeast, an economic development partnership, and international firms from nations such as Australia, China, and South Africa. Among the factors were its waterways, such as Wilmington’s seaport; advantageous infrastructure, such as highway connectivity; military members that are also viewed as lucrative potential employees; comparatively lower costs, such as corporate tax rate.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 38 Issue 4, April 2018 , p83-84, 86, 88, 90-93 Periodical Website
Record #:
40020
Author(s):
Abstract:
Along with education, ECU is making a difference in fields such as medicine, life sciences, engineering, technology, and business. Graduates are a particular boon to rural communities, most vulnerable to the economic and occupational challenges the region has known the past few decades. Another industry noted as a potential booster to a region without textiles and tobacco as occupational powerhouses is ecotourism.
Record #:
40614
Author(s):
Abstract:
The greater popularity of tobacco products overseas makes this plant still a major cash crop for North Carolina. Therein lies a delicate balance: supporting the manufacture of these products in light of reports of e-cigarette related health hazards and controversy surrounding the marketing of such products to youth.