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42 results for "Tobacco industry"
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Record #:
29338
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Abstract:
Anti-tobacco sentiment has risen since cigarette smoking was blamed for thousands of deaths each year. This year the federal government made substantive reductions in its support for tobacco, which has had tremendous economic, political, and cultural importance in North Carolina. Despite this, state politicians and tobacco spokesmen have responded with little protest.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 5, May 1981, p12-59, il, por
Record #:
13623
Author(s):
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The threat of a price ceiling, which might have greatly impaired one of North Carolina's most picturesque and important enterprises, tobacco, has been removed for the moment.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 14, Sept 1951, p3-6, 19, map, f
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Record #:
1944
Abstract:
Jim Johnston, chairman of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, is one spokesman for the tobacco industry who uses a conciliatory approach when dealing with tobacco critics.
Record #:
12207
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Accounting for the majority of farm income within Pitt County, tobacco farming has sustained the community since 1725. Selling more flue-cured tobacco than any other county in the United States, Pitt County merchants established a market in 1891 from which to sell their goods. Initially, a one warehouse operation, membership in the Greenville Market grew to 31 different auctioneers, who, as of 1956, sold 97,367,576 pounds of tobacco, 57,161,694 pounds of which was grown locally.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 10, Oct 1957, p15-18, il
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Record #:
40020
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Along with education, ECU is making a difference in fields such as medicine, life sciences, engineering, technology, and business. Graduates are a particular boon to rural communities, most vulnerable to the economic and occupational challenges the region has known the past few decades. Another industry noted as a potential booster to a region without textiles and tobacco as occupational powerhouses is ecotourism.
Record #:
1870
Author(s):
Abstract:
RJ Reynolds Tobacco International Inc. purchased another plant in the former Soviet Union, bringing to five the number of cigarette manufacturing plants owned by the company here. RJR's international division is far outselling the domestic division.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 9, Sept 1994, p59, il
Record #:
38219
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several factors were attributed to business booming between North Carolina’s Southeast, an economic development partnership, and international firms from nations such as Australia, China, and South Africa. Among the factors were its waterways, such as Wilmington’s seaport; advantageous infrastructure, such as highway connectivity; military members that are also viewed as lucrative potential employees; comparatively lower costs, such as corporate tax rate.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 38 Issue 4, April 2018 , p83-84, 86, 88, 90-93 Periodical Website
Record #:
31648
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seventh District Representative Charles G. Rose of Fayetteville believes North Carolina tobacco farmers are not getting a fair share in the market place, and he’s supporting efforts to change that situation. In an interview, Rose discusses the Congressional Rural Caucus, rural development, tobacco allotments, and import tariffs on foreign tobacco.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 9, Sept 1975, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
25601
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Abstract:
Located in Tobaccoville, a new R.J. Reynolds $800 million dollar plant is currently under construction. The new plant will cover 26 acres of land, employ 2,000 construction workers, have a cafeteria and medical facility, and produce 120 billion cigarettes a year. The Tobaccoville plant is part of a billion dollar, 10-year expansion program for Reynolds Tobacco, which employs more than 12,000 workers in Winston-Salem.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 24, Dec. 21-Jan 17 1984, p4-5, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1198
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Friends of Tobacco, a group of farmers, businessmen, legislators, and other tobacco advocates in the state, argues that smoking doesn't cause cancer and that the tobacco industry is being discriminated against.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 33, Aug 1993, p10-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
21318
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Abstract:
Between 1899 and 1904, Durham native Edward James Parrish lived in Japan as a representative for James B. Duke's American Tobacco Company. Parrish worked closely with the Murai Brothers Company Ltd., to improve production, financing, and marketing techniques for the tobacco company. In 1904, the Japanese Diet introduced and passed legislation that began government ownership of all tobacco manufacturing, Parrish was influential in the company receiving a good settlement with the government.
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Record #:
31659
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Abstract:
United States Senator Sam Ervin discusses the importance of North Carolina agriculture and identifies developments that threaten it. Ervin also highlights important business and trade elements that provide services to sustain farm operations, and the state’s flue cured tobacco market.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, Mar 1974, p6-7, il
Record #:
16936
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Abstract:
Beacham provides background on tobacco dependency in North Carolina, stressing the importance of defining dependence in a broad way as they pursue policy options and community development projects.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 10 Issue , 2002, p23-28, map, f
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Record #:
12607
Abstract:
Richard J. Reynolds is an initial member of the NORTH CAROLINA magazine Business Hall of Fame. He was the founder of the RJ Reynolds Tobacco Company. Among its famous products were Prince Albert pipe tobacco and perhaps the most famous cigarette of all time - Camel.
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Record #:
15485
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Abstract:
Indigenous tobacco plants satisfied early settlers' appetites but in 1852 the first \"bright leaf\" tobacco was grown and started the state's tobacco boom. The popularity of J. L. Green's tobacco with Civil War soldiers created the world-famous \"Bull Durham\" brand. The Duke's became prolific tobacco farmers and the \"Duke's Mixture\" helped J. B. Duke form the American Tobacco Company. The tobacco industry was not limited to the 'Triangle' and places like Winston-Salem became cigarette manufacturing locales.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 17, Sept 1935, p7, 19, il
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