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41 results for "Tobacco industry"
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Record #:
38219
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several factors were attributed to business booming between North Carolina’s Southeast, an economic development partnership, and international firms from nations such as Australia, China, and South Africa. Among the factors were its waterways, such as Wilmington’s seaport; advantageous infrastructure, such as highway connectivity; military members that are also viewed as lucrative potential employees; comparatively lower costs, such as corporate tax rate.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 38 Issue 4, April 2018 , p83-84, 86, 88, 90-93 Periodical Website
Record #:
28575
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Reynolds American Inc. agreed to be sold to British American Tobacco PLC for $49 billion. Under Susan Cameron, former CEO and current executive chairman of Reynolds, the company transformed tobacco and became a leader in products that are reduced risk.
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Record #:
40020
Author(s):
Abstract:
Along with education, ECU is making a difference in fields such as medicine, life sciences, engineering, technology, and business. Graduates are a particular boon to rural communities, most vulnerable to the economic and occupational challenges the region has known the past few decades. Another industry noted as a potential booster to a region without textiles and tobacco as occupational powerhouses is ecotourism.
Record #:
24605
Author(s):
Abstract:
In January 1964, the Surgeon General explained the findings of a recent study—that cigarette smoking was linked to lung cancer and heart disease. Since that time, the tobacco industry has received a number of blows, including the end of the quota system in 2004. Some North Carolina tobacco farmers continue to grow tobacco, but many discontinued harvesting the crop and instead turned to farming other products, such as berries and grapes.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p166-168, 170, 172, 174, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15785
Abstract:
A report released in September 2011 by Oxfam American and the Farm Labor Organizing Committee details the human rights abuses in North Carolina's tobacco industry while unveiling detailed claims of exploitation and mistreatment of undocumented workers in tobacco fields throughout the state.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 45, Sept 2011, p7, 9, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
16936
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beacham provides background on tobacco dependency in North Carolina, stressing the importance of defining dependence in a broad way as they pursue policy options and community development projects.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 10 Issue , 2002, p23-28, map, f
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Record #:
16940
Author(s):
Abstract:
Estes discusses the alternatives to tobacco farming for North Carolina farmers considering the growing changes to the tobacco industry.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 10 Issue , 2002, p42-48
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Record #:
31190
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center in Asheville, North Carolina is the nation’s first “marketing center,” returning to the traditional tobacco warehouse auction system. In addition to allowing the auction, the center’s project also pays warehouse, grading and assessment fees, and other marketing fees typically paid by growers.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Feb 2002, p22-23, por
Record #:
31233
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Mike Easley describes his life growing up on his family’s tobacco farm in Nash Count. Easley also discusses the recent tobacco settlement, rural North Carolina, education, economic development, and the electric utility industry.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 11, Nov 2001, p16-19, por
Record #:
4418
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the start of the 20th-century, three industries were gaining prominence -- tobacco, textiles, and furniture. Each made its influence felt in a different geographic location. Tobacco was the Coastal Plain's big moneymaker. Two hundred textile plants spurred growth in the Piedmont, encouraging farmers to grow more cotton. Furniture factories developed in the foothills, near their source of raw materials.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p23-25, il
Record #:
1870
Author(s):
Abstract:
RJ Reynolds Tobacco International Inc. purchased another plant in the former Soviet Union, bringing to five the number of cigarette manufacturing plants owned by the company here. RJR's international division is far outselling the domestic division.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 9, Sept 1994, p59, il
Record #:
1944
Abstract:
Jim Johnston, chairman of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, is one spokesman for the tobacco industry who uses a conciliatory approach when dealing with tobacco critics.
Record #:
1032
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biotechnological research with tobacco plants can provide an alternative market for North Carolina's tobacco farmers as well as cheaper drugs used in the treatment of cancer and cheaper foods for consumers.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 14, Apr 1993, p9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1116
Author(s):
Abstract:
A number of factors make North Carolina ports attractive to the importers and exporters of tobacco, so the volume of the leaf moved through these ports is considerable.
Source:
Cargo (NoCar HE 554 N8 C36x), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Summer 1993, p8-11
Record #:
1131
Author(s):
Abstract:
A series of articles discusses tobacco's impact on North Carolina's and the U.S. economy, the flue-curing process, and the prognosis for tobacco's future.
Source:
North Carolina State Economist (NoCar HD 1401 T34), Vol. Issue , June 1993, p1-4, por