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42 results for "Tobacco industry"
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Record #:
28575
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Reynolds American Inc. agreed to be sold to British American Tobacco PLC for $49 billion. Under Susan Cameron, former CEO and current executive chairman of Reynolds, the company transformed tobacco and became a leader in products that are reduced risk.
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Record #:
13748
Author(s):
Abstract:
K.M. Biggs, Incorporated, in Robeson County this year becomes the largest grower of tobacco in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 37, Feb 1952, p6, 24, f
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Record #:
31233
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Governor Mike Easley describes his life growing up on his family’s tobacco farm in Nash Count. Easley also discusses the recent tobacco settlement, rural North Carolina, education, economic development, and the electric utility industry.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 11, Nov 2001, p16-19, por
Record #:
1032
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biotechnological research with tobacco plants can provide an alternative market for North Carolina's tobacco farmers as well as cheaper drugs used in the treatment of cancer and cheaper foods for consumers.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 14, Apr 1993, p9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1116
Author(s):
Abstract:
A number of factors make North Carolina ports attractive to the importers and exporters of tobacco, so the volume of the leaf moved through these ports is considerable.
Source:
Cargo (NoCar HE 554 N8 C36x), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Summer 1993, p8-11
Record #:
30104
Author(s):
Abstract:
It has been suggested that the cigarette shortage is due to a shortage in cigarette leaf tobacco. Developers argue however, that the shortage is due to a lack of manpower rather than shortages in the flue-cured or burley leaf tobacco.
Record #:
30233
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the past two years the North Carolina State Ports Authority has seen a substantial increase in the number of shipping lines calling at Wilmington for containerized tobacco. This new traffic is credited to efforts by the tobacco industry itself.
Source:
Cargo (NoCar HE 554 N8 C36x), Vol. 17 Issue 2, 2nd Quarter 1992, p13-14
Record #:
13830
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1952, the Taylor Brothers Tobacco Company of Winston-Salem was sold to the American Snuff Company. This sale marks the end of small, independent tobacco manufacturers in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 32, Jan 1953, p1-2, 19, por
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Record #:
1258
Abstract:
In this special advertising section, the Tobacco Growers Association of North Carolina discusses the economic impact of the state's tobacco industry, stating that it generated $14 billion, some 20 percent of the state's economic activity, in 1992.
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Record #:
13362
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Abstract:
The P. Lorillard Company began construction on a $13 million dollar tobacco plant set to be the largest one-story factory of its kind in the world. Encompassing 12 acres, Lorillard's new plant is the largest construction project attempted in the state as well as the biggest expansion the company has undertaken in 25 years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p9-10, 27, il
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Record #:
24691
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Abstract:
The P. Lorillard Co. plant, which manufactures tobacco, will open at a new location in Greensboro. Because of this expansion, North Carolina will have four of the six largest cigarette manufacturing companies within its boundaries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p9-10, 27, il
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Record #:
4418
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the start of the 20th-century, three industries were gaining prominence -- tobacco, textiles, and furniture. Each made its influence felt in a different geographic location. Tobacco was the Coastal Plain's big moneymaker. Two hundred textile plants spurred growth in the Piedmont, encouraging farmers to grow more cotton. Furniture factories developed in the foothills, near their source of raw materials.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p23-25, il
Record #:
24485
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article presents the history of cigarettes, tobacco, and smoking in North Carolina, as well as presenting a number of historic advertisements for cigarettes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 9, February 1978, p10-15, il
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Record #:
31314
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s congressional delegation, along with members from other tobacco producing states, will be trying to cash in some green stamps this year as they try to save the federal tobacco program. Federal support of the tobacco industry is being criticized for the negative effects of tobacco on health, and faces competition with foreign markets and imported tobacco leaves.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 3, Mar 1985, p20-21, il
Record #:
31416
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina members of Congress have been working to save the government program that gives a support price to the tobacco leaf when it is marketed. Changes are being made to freeze the support price on the 1983 crop at the 1982 level, and to phase out allotment leasing. This would have a drastic effect on North Carolina small farms.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 8, Aug 1983, p24-25, il