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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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30 results for "North Carolina. General Assembly--Budget"
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Record #:
29082
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Abstract:
Nine-million dollars in annual tax cuts passed by the North Carolina legislature has caused local governments to raise taxes to better fund schools. Critics argue that the budget shortchanges students while enriching the wealthy. Proponents argue that the budget will dramatically increase teacher pay and improve public education outcomes.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 25, July 2017, p6, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27183
Abstract:
The North Carolina Senate passed its $22.2 billion budget on Friday, on a 26–13 party-line vote. Good things about the budget include a raise in teacher pay, elimination of the light rail funding cap, and reconsideration of historically black college and university tuition. Bad parts of the budget are cuts to low-income energy assistance, Jordan Lake clean-up, and education.
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Record #:
23883
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Abstract:
By the start of the fiscal year, July 1, 2015, Republicans in General Assembly have yet to pass a state budget for North Carolina. North Carolina locals fear that budget talks will be postponed and come too late for state schools to be able budget appropriately.
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Record #:
24126
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina legislature recently passed the state budget after a 3-month discussion of the budget's components. The author highlights the biggest issues with the budget, which include topics such as regressive taxation, education, light rail projects, the environment, and Planned Parenthood funding.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 38, September 2015, p8-9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
19720
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Abstract:
The author reviews the past week's budgetary decisions by the State Legislature. Cuts to programs for tobacco use prevention, alcohol abuse treatment facilities, and funds to the Coastal Resources Commission were just some of the programs receiving far less funding under the Republican led government.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 21, May 2013, p10 Periodical Website
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Record #:
19916
Author(s):
Abstract:
The constitutionality of \"school choice\" is a hotly debated topic amongst politicians and citizens. Republicans are advocating a school voucher system which would take $50 million of state tax revenue away from public schools and reallocate to private education. Incorporating the voucher idea into the state budget may fall short because opponents contend that such a system would allow tax dollars to go to religious institutions.
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Record #:
29301
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1991 North Carolina General Assembly met with great controversy after convening. This year marked the largest cuts in state spending along side the largest tax increase in state history. Spending cuts were delivered mainly to education budgets, while tax increases were made to the state sales tax and corporate income taxes.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p21-23, il
Record #:
18021
Author(s):
Abstract:
Notwithstanding the problems of the nation, North Carolina continues to be in excellent financial condition, with moderate debt, a balanced budget, and an end of the year surplus expected.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 36 Issue 8, May 1970, p9-11
Record #:
32229
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article provides statistics and an analysis of the Advisory Budget Commission’s $3.3 billion blueprint for operating State Government. The article discusses anticipated General Fund sources, the outlook on estimated revenues during the next biennium, recommendations for public school teacher pay and highway improvement.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Feb 1969, p15-18, il, bibl, f
Record #:
32317
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Scott proposed in the legislative budget to increase the gross premium tax on insurance companies doing business in North Carolina. The state’s life insurance industry believes this is an undue tax burden, which would further result in driving off investment capital from the state, placing the domestic life insurance industry at a further disadvantage in competing with out-of-state firms.
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Record #:
31513
Author(s):
Abstract:
The recommended North Carolina state budget for 1969-1971 will most likely reach and/or exceed $3.5 billion. This is an estimate based on the recommended total by the incumbent Governor Dan Moore to Governor-elect Robert Scott. It is additionally estimated that the credit balance for 1969 will exceed $100 million, allowing the incoming Governor to make some adjustments to the budget if needed.
Record #:
31182
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite being a primary concern of North Carolina's Governor Sanford, public schools are getting a smaller share of the General Fund than received under previous administrations. This is due to the sharp decline in pupil attendance, and the millions usually spent on pupils will become available to help pay for teacher salary increases and other public school improvements. In turn, more funds are left over from sales tax to pay for expansions and improvements in other state operations.
Record #:
31181
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Fund budget presented to legislature in February recommends an 18.1 percent increase in appropriations for operations. This combined with a increase in spending voted upon in 1961 will result in General Fund tax spending in the new biennium at a rate of $1.64 for every dollar spent in the last biennium. In other words, a 64.6 percent hike in General Fund tax support for budgeting operations.
Record #:
31022
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Fund for 1961-1963 will begin with a credit balance of $53,088,469, three times the credit balance the current biennium started with. With anticipated revenue increases of over $19 million, appropriation recommendations call for the expenditure of the entire credit balance.
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Record #:
31007
Author(s):
Abstract:
Revenues collected from 1959-1960 amounted to over $328 million, while expenditures totaled just over $277 million. this left the state with a budget surplus of nearly $19 million. The majority of revenues came from individual income taxes and sales taxes, while the majority spent was in education and public welfare programs.