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47 results for "North Carolina--History"
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Record #:
11948
Author(s):
Abstract:
A list of all the North Carolina counties and the origin of their names is listed alphabetically in this article. From Alamance County to Yancey, the dates and inspiration for these names hold a long history of the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p53-56
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Record #:
12822
Abstract:
Containing progressive maps that depict the growth of North Carolina counties from 1700 through 1912, this is an illustrated chronology as opposed to an article.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 12, Nov 1960, p11, il
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Record #:
13372
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Abstract:
Wiley recounts several missed bits of North Carolina's long history such as the journeys of German Bishop August Gottlieb Spangenberg through North Carolina, a duel that never happened, and a Revolutionary baker.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 13, Aug 1953, p12-13, il
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Record #:
13366
Abstract:
Discussing the varied history of northeastern North Carolina, there is information about historic locations, beloved past times, and reasons to visit this portion of the state.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 26, May 1955, p16-18, il, map
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Record #:
13490
Abstract:
Some two million North Carolinians now live on land which was once the property of an English nobleman, John Lord Carteret, the first Earl of Granville - the largest individual landholder in North Carolina history.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 31, Jan 1954, p1-2, 12, map
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Record #:
13496
Abstract:
Part two of the articles on the Granville Grant (previously in 2 January 1954, Vol. 21, No. 31, pp. 1-2, 12) describes the remainder of the case and its significance for North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 32, Jan 1954, p4 ,19
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Record #:
15026
Author(s):
Abstract:
You will look in vain on the North Carolina map for Tryon, Bute, Glasgow, and Dobbs Counties, but many years ago they were a part of the State.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 51, May 1943, p7, 14
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Record #:
22764
Author(s):
Abstract:
Art and architecture historian, Kirk Savage, provides a brief history of monument construction in the United States, highlighting the boost in memorials following the Civil War and the lack of monuments for African Americans and women. To emphasize contemporary trends in public memorials, he then describes three recently erected monuments in North Carolina: the 9/11 World Trade Center Beam, Chapel Hill's monument to the \"Unsung Founders,\" and the Andy Griffith monuments.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Fall 2014, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
23594
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new book entitled, 'Dixie Be Damned: 300 Years of Insurrection in the American South,' examines North Carolina's role in experiments of resistance and protest throughout history.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 24, June 2015, p21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23908
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Abstract:
Along the state roads of North Carolina over 1,500 historical markers commemorate important people, places and events in the state's history. The author investigates the origins of the N.C. Highway Historical Marker Program, the Program's procedures, and the stories behind some of the state's markers.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p37-38, 40,42, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24264
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Abstract:
Seersucker has been a part of Southern dress since the early twentieth century, though the fabric's history stretches back a number of centuries. The lightweight fabric and classic design makes for the perfect summer suit and is still popular today.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 3, August 2015, p156-160, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24501
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Abstract:
In 2015, UNC Chapel Hill’s Southern Oral History Program (SOHP) celebrated its fortieth anniversary. This article includes an interview with SOHP Director, Malinda Maynor Lowery, who discusses the current projects SOHP is working on and the ways in which the program strives to include Digital Humanities in its work.
Record #:
24932
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1953, the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association has brought students from across North Carolina together to learn more about North Carolina history in their area. More than 5,000 students participate in the program across 53 counties, making the North Carolina program the largest in the nation. Students learn about their community’s place in history, conduct research, and present what they discovered.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p30, 32-33, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24934
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Abstract:
The fall line between the Piedmont and the Coastal Plain is an important aspect of North Carolina history and geology. The side of the fall line that early settlers lived on greatly influenced their lives and their line of work. Today, however, many people don’t understand the significance of this geologic marvel.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p76-78, 81, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
25699
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Abstract:
Dr. I. Randolph Daniel, Jr., assistant professor of anthropology at East Carolina, is using ancient stone tools to trace the trail of the first inhabitants of North Carolina.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 1999, p8, il Periodical Website