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39 results for "North Carolina Museum of Art--Collections"
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Record #:
29081
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The North Carolina Museum of Art opened a new African gallery featuring decorative and ceremonial artifacts, as well as contemporary artworks. Linda Dougherty, the museum’s chief and contemporary curator, discusses the meaning of the collection and the challenges of merging folk and fine art.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 24, July 2017, p23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
35350
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As Emily Matthews alluded, this snipe’s tale could have ended from its collision into the NC Museum of Art facility. Through the efforts of the corpse’s discoverer and preservation tactics such as storage and tagging, though, this bird is part of the NCMoA’s collections.
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Record #:
35358
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The quintet of profiles in this article covered topics such as the larval stage of the Trapjaw ant; the “Lost and Found Colonies: Using Science and Technology to Uncover the Past” exhibit, which included Roanoke; the North Carolina Museum of Art’s newest animal ambassador, the Tenrec; the NCMoA’s film “Museum Alive 3-D,” and Alvin Braswell, the NCMoA’s 2017 Thomas Quay Wildlife Diversity Award winner.
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Record #:
29502
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The Museum recently acquired six new works of art and is opening a new video gallery in the East Building. Giovanni Martinelli’s Memento Mori: Death Comes to the Table circa 1630-38, Yink Shonibare’s, MBE Wind Sculpture II 2013, Flemish, Antwerp School’s Saint Jerome in His Study circa 1560-70, Hieronymus Mittnacht’s Torah Shield 1747-49 are four of the works that were acquired. The artist of each work, an illustration of the work, and a description of the subject and style are detailed. A preview of the upcoming exhibits in the new video gallery is also included and will feature the work of James Nares.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Summer 2014, p14-19
Record #:
29512
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Art’s statue of Bacchus is a composite of two ancient fragments that were assembled along with other baroque additions. The discovery was initially made in 1958 and it was never displayed as a result. A derestoration is planned over the next couple of years. The torso is one of only four other Roman imperial-period torsos known to exist and is from 2nd century, the head of Bacchus is from the 1st-3rd century and belonged to a Roman statue of a Greek Dionysos, and the left arm, hand, and some supports are baroque additions and will be removed eventually.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2014, p24-25, il
Record #:
29517
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The painting Lady Mary Villiers, Later Duchess of Richmond and Lennox, with Charles Hamilton, Lord Arran (circa 1637) was recently restored by the Museum’s Conservation Lab. Flemish artist Anthony van Dyck’s portrait is considered a masterpiece, but suffered from discolored varnish, areas of retouching, and pentimenti. The cleaning and restoration process are described along with the quality and history of the painting.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2013, p22-23, il
Record #:
29520
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The Museum’s newest acquisition of contemporary art is Kehinde Wiley’s "Judith and Holofernes" (2012). Wiley is known for his monumental portraits of African Americans placed in historical poses and settings appropriated from Old Master paintings. Wiley is known for critiquing the racism of art history and this portrait references a 17th century painting by Giovanni Baglione, Judith and the Head of Holofernes (1608). Wiley’s painting can be interpreted as a comment on racial and gender identity and inequity, the representation of women throughout art history, and society’s ideals for beauty.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2013, p20-21
Record #:
13722
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The North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh is home to the most visible expression of Jewish cultural heritage in the South. Housed in the Judaic Art Gallery, the collection owes much to Dr. Abram Kanof, who championed its creation. The museum is one of only two general collections in the nation with a permanent Judaic collection.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 10, Mar 2011, p140-142, 144, 146-147, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
29611
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The Museum’s most recent acquisition is Jennifer Steinkamp’s video installation titled Mike Kelley. The image of Steinkamp’s dancing tree is one of the first works visitors see when entering the West Building and has quickly become one of the most popular and captivating works of art at the Museum. The artist uses light, color, and movement to create an image inspired by the natural world, but created using 3-D computer animation software. Projected on a wall, the tree cycles through the four seasons in eight minutes and invites viewers to immerse themselves in the work by taking the time to watch it change.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2010, p20-21
Record #:
29612
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Jaume Plensa’s Doors of Jerusalem I, II, & III greet visitors as they enter the Museum’s West Building. The three larger figures are mounted high on the wall, are translucent, and are lit from within with words covering their bodies. The words are from the Song of Solomon found in the Bible and the names of the eight gates of the walled city of Jerusalem cover the figures mouths. The figures are described as contemporary gargoyles or celestial beings and their composition and the artist’s style are detailed here.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2010, p22-23
Record #:
29621
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Fannie and Alan Leslie bequeathed 30 paintings to the Museum and 13 paintings from their collection are currently on display. The Leslie Collection paintings are examples of modern American art and include major works by leading Southern California modernists. In a preview of the exhibition, the works and styles of artists Stanton Macdonald-Wright, Hans Burkhardt, and Lee Mullican are detailed.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2008, p6-9, il
Record #:
29632
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Abstract:
The Museum recently acquired a pair of 18th century Torah finials as a gift from the Friends of the Judaic Art Gallery. The finials are ornamental handles which are attached to wooden staves and rollers to help open scrolls which contain Jewish scripture. This pair was originally made for the Grote Synagogue in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The finials survived plundering from the Nazis during World War II while many other items in the Grote Synagogue did not. The finials, their use, their history, and their acquisition are all detailed.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2008, p12-13
Record #:
29694
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The North Carolina Museum of art knows the value of provenance. The painting Madonna and Child by Andrea Del Sarto (1486-1531) was suspected of being stolen by the Nazis in World War II only three years after discovering their painting Madonna and Child in a Landscape by Lucas Cranach was stolen by the Nazis. After being approached by a claimant who wanted to seize the suspected stolen Del Sarto painting, the Museum conducted an investigation to verify the painting’s provenance. The painting was found to have been legitimately sold by its owner and purchased by the Museum. After questions about provenance, the Museum has hired an expert to examine its collection and fill in any gaps in the history of ownership of its works.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Spring 2008, p14
Record #:
29693
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Abstract:
Many of the works of art at the North Carolina Museum were owned by men and women of power, royalty, wealth, and nobility. The Bear Hunt (1639-40) by Peter Paul Rubens and Frans Synders was owned by King Philip IV of Spain and was commissioned by the king to hang in his summer palace, the Alcazar, in Madrid. The history of ownership of Thomas Hart Benton’s Spring on the Missouri, and Cornelis de Vos’ and Peter Paul Reubens’ Philip IV are also detailed. The topic of art ownership and how it affects the value of a work of art is also discussed.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Spring 2008, p10-11
Record #:
29696
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The Museum recently acquired a new woven photo work by contemporary artist Dinh Q. Le. Le’s photo-weavings present contradictory histories of the Vietnam War exploring how context, experience, and memory impact our view of history. The artist took film stills from the Hollywood movie Apocalypse Now and weaved them with black-and-white photographs of Vietnamese citizens and images of parachutes taken during or following the Vietnam War.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 2007, p8-9