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44 results for "Hurricane Floyd, 1999"
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Record #:
39996
Abstract:
This chronicle of the hurricane that left “the flood of the century” in its wake left behind a deluge of memories. Accompanying figures such as 52 deaths and over 500 million dollars in lost crops were interviews of people from Northeast, Grifton, Tick Bite, Wallace, and New Bern.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Fall 2019, p13-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
40659
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Though focusing on the isolating impact of a recent hurricane on Ocracoke, the state's experience with Hurricane Dorian taught the author any area might become solitary in the midst of floodwaters. It also prompted her to pose the question to all North Carolina communities, townships, and neighborhoods: do you have a survival plan in place, in the event of weather-generated isolation from local, regional, and state resources?
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 51 Issue 11, November 2019, p4
Record #:
28478
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The environmental impact of hurricanes Matthew and Floyd are compared. Floyd cost more than 11.3 billion dollars in 2017 dollars, more than triple Matthew’s losses. Floyd destroyed $1.1 billion in crops, livestock, and farm buildings versus $544 million because of Matthew. While the losses from 2016’s Matthew were not as bad as 1999’s Floyd, problems still exist especially concerning the state’s hog industry, water and sewer systems, and poultry industry.
Record #:
12405
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Not only did people lose homes and property during Hurricane Floyd, many were separated from their pets. Over 1,200 rescued animals were scattered in shelters around the state. Many never were reunited with their owners. In 2003, the State Animal Response Team (SART) partnered with other organizations to provide micro-chips to identify pets. To date, only 56,000 of the state's estimated 2.6 million companion animals have been equipped in this manner.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2009, p10-12, il Periodical Website
Record #:
12407
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What has been called a 500-year flood devastated Eastern North Carolina in the wake of Hurricane Floyd. Entire communities were wiped out in Princeville, Greenville, and Kinston. Allegood describes recovery and rebuilding efforts in these areas.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2009, p14-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
12402
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Abstract:
Ten years ago everyone in the state was watching Hurricane Floyd as the storm that was supposed to hit Florida took an unexpected turn toward North Carolina. Smith summarizes Floyd's approach, the aftermath, and some lessons learned.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2009, p4-5, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
12403
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North Carolina's barrier islands, like Oak Island, were in the path of powerful Hurricane Floyd. Residents share their memories of the event and how they recovered.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2009, p6-7, il Periodical Website
Record #:
12411
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Now an assistant administrator at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Diane Furgione was the warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service office in Morehead City/Newport when Hurricanes Dennis and Floyd struck. She recounts her experiences and lessons learned.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2009, p28-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
12410
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Wienke discusses the effect flooding from Hurricane Floyd had on blue crab, oysters, bay scallop fisheries and the fisherman who harvest them.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2009, p25-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
9427
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Abstract:
Princeville, founded in 1865, is the oldest town in the United States incorporated by African Americans. The flooding that followed Hurricane Floyd in 1999 destroyed the town. The was not the first time the town had experienced flooding, but it was the first time that national attention was turned on this small, rural community. Princeville was acknowledged as a place of great historical culture and significance. Refusing a FEMA buyout of their damaged or destroyed homes, the citizens chose to remain and rebuild their community.
Record #:
34364
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North Carolina experienced a string of debilitating natural disasters over a five-year period beginning with Hurricane Floyd in 1999, and the response to some of these crises is still ongoing in many places. Government leaders and industries are cooperating to try to fix the policy and planning failures that exacerbated damages. Revised, comprehensive floodplain mapping is one of the preventative actions that emerged as a direct result of Hurricane Floyd.
Record #:
7661
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Princeville, located in Edgecombe County, has a unique place in history. It is the first town in the country incorporated by African Americans. In 1999, floods caused by Hurricane Floyd devastated the town. Six years later Princeville continues to rebuild itself. Whirty discusses the efforts of citizens to bring their town back to life.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 37 Issue 9, Sept 2005, p18-19, il
Record #:
6745
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Abstract:
Hurricane Floyd was the worst natural disaster in the history of North Carolina. Two weeks after Hurricane Dennis dropped ten inches of rain, Floyd dropped another 26 inches on September 15 and 16, 1999. Severe flooding resulted, with damages reaching $6 billion, 60,000 homes flooded, and fifty-two deaths. The authors interviewed over fifty people in seventeen counties for their book, \"Faces From the Flood: Hurricane Floyd Remembered.\" Excerpts are presented in the article.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 5, May 2004, p10-12, il
Record #:
6888
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In 1999, Hurricane Floyd cut a destructive path across eastern North Carolina, becoming the deadliest storm in the state's history. The storm caused 35 deaths, damages of $3 billion, and destruction of 7,000 homes. Smith examines the ongoing recovery efforts, new forecasting technologies, and research into the state's fisheries five years after the storm.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2004, p16-20, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
26022
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Researchers from Carolina’s Southern Oral History Program made a documentary of Grifton, a town devastated by Hurricane Floyd in 1999. Residents were interviewed about their recovery and coping experiences.
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