NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


21 results for "Housing development"
Currently viewing results 16 - 21
Previous
PAGE OF 2
Record #:
32225
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jones-Onslow Electric Membership Corporation of Jacksonville is growing at an average of nine-hundred new consumers a year. Alvin Morton, its general manager, discusses why the Jones-Onslow area is growing at one of the fastest rates in the state. In addition to the military and tourism industries, mobile home manufacturing has created new jobs and contributed to the area’s thriving economy.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Aug 1969, p20-21, il, por
Record #:
32223
Author(s):
Abstract:
The growing popularity of mobile homes is making the manufacture and sale of them one of North Carolina’s fastest growing businesses. Mobile homes may be the answer to the housing shortage because they offer complete housing packages, completely furnished, at economical prices well below the cost of other housing.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Aug 1969, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
32224
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bill Wellons is planning to develop a “mobile home city” called Olde Farme, located near Fort Bragg at Fayetteville. Wellons decided on mobile homes rather than houses because of high building costs and interest rates. Five-hundred acres of former farm and wood land are being converted to develop mobile housing, recreation and service shops for Olde Farme.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Aug 1969, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
34440
Author(s):
Abstract:
Moore’s Sanctuary is an African-American community in the west side of Charlotte, and its foundation has existed for 148 years. As the City of Charlotte faces a shortage in affordable and workforce housing, developers are looking to acquire property in the west side. Rickey Hall, founder of the West Side Community Land Trust, hopes to purchase land and ensure longtime west-side residents have a place to live as land values increase.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
36290
Author(s):
Abstract:
A building part of downtown Fayetteville since the 1920s had received a new lease on life. The facility, formerly a site for businesses such as the Prince Charles Hotel, would now house apartments and offer retail space.
Record #:
39588
Author(s):
Abstract:
This urban revival project, initiated by Myers Park Presbyterian Church, sought to offer families in Charlotte’s Grier Heights better housing. Constructed by the church’s nonprofit CrossRoads, it consists of 35 mixed income housing sold to individuals making 80% of area median income. Other endeavors undertaken by CrossRoads to improve the surrounding area include after-school programs and continuing education opportunities.