NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


21 results for "Housing development"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
31294
Abstract:
North Carolina ranks fourth in the nation in manufactured home production. A manufactured home is a residential dwelling that is made in a factory and meets the federal standards for safety, durability and efficiency. This is a comprehensive guide to buying and upgrading a manufactured home in North Carolina, including advice and information on energy efficiency, preparing a site and consumer protection.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 30 Issue 4, Apr 1998, p16-21, il, por, map
Record #:
29025
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2007, the Durham Housing Authority (DHA) sold twenty-acres to a Philadelphia-based company to develop affordable housing for low-income students at North Carolina Central University. Since then, however, no development has proceeded. Now the DHA is trying to repurchase the property.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 16, May 2017, p8-9, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
31554
Abstract:
The Qualla Housing Authority is planning to carve and build new brick dwellings for the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians directly within the mountains of Western North Carolina, but various soil conservation problems are associated with such a project. The Soil Conservation Service recommended to use a high-pressure hydroseeder to plant grass, prevent erosion and maintain a foundation.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 11 Issue 10, Oct 1979, p11, por
Record #:
30999
Author(s):
Abstract:
Advanced Energy, a Raleigh-based organization, is helping to rescue uninhabitable houses and turn them into new, energy-efficient residences. Their partnership with Builders of Hope is implementing the program in homes slated for demolition in Raleigh. The program is also works to ensure that the homes are financially affordable.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 10, Oct 2008, p22, il
Full Text:
Record #:
31542
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has become the second major federal agency to agree to begin tailoring its funding programs to fit North Carolina’s balanced growth efforts across the state. A two-year experiment will determine whether funds and assistance are most effective when funneled through the state, an area-wide planning agency, or directly to the local governments.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 11 Issue 1, Jan 1979, p28
Subject(s):
Record #:
32225
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jones-Onslow Electric Membership Corporation of Jacksonville is growing at an average of nine-hundred new consumers a year. Alvin Morton, its general manager, discusses why the Jones-Onslow area is growing at one of the fastest rates in the state. In addition to the military and tourism industries, mobile home manufacturing has created new jobs and contributed to the area’s thriving economy.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Aug 1969, p20-21, il, por
Record #:
32223
Author(s):
Abstract:
The growing popularity of mobile homes is making the manufacture and sale of them one of North Carolina’s fastest growing businesses. Mobile homes may be the answer to the housing shortage because they offer complete housing packages, completely furnished, at economical prices well below the cost of other housing.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Aug 1969, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
23267
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lincoln Apartments sit empty and derelict after more than two years after residents have been evicted. The city of Durham must deal with the problem of low-income housing that does not meet minimum housing codes.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 1, January 2015, p6-7, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
2148
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the first half of 1994, the value of single-family residential construction was over $2.7 billion statewide, up ten percent from 1993, as buyers took advantage of low mortgage rates and contractors began community sites of 2,000 to 4,000 homes.
Subject(s):
Record #:
31041
Author(s):
Abstract:
The natural spring once touted as the southeastern North Carolina's most promising resource is not the center of a new and novel development. Bouncing Log Spring has become Boiling Springs Lake, Inc; the 14000 acre coastal oak and long leaf pine area is being transformed into a budding housing development surrounding a 350 acre man-make lake.
Source:
Record #:
706
Author(s):
Abstract:
When the New River in Ashe and Allegheny counties was named a Wild and Scenic River in 1976, many citizens breathed a sigh of relief. Now the New River is engaged in a crucial battle with residential developments.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
32224
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bill Wellons is planning to develop a “mobile home city” called Olde Farme, located near Fort Bragg at Fayetteville. Wellons decided on mobile homes rather than houses because of high building costs and interest rates. Five-hundred acres of former farm and wood land are being converted to develop mobile housing, recreation and service shops for Olde Farme.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Aug 1969, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
36290
Author(s):
Abstract:
A building part of downtown Fayetteville since the 1920s had received a new lease on life. The facility, formerly a site for businesses such as the Prince Charles Hotel, would now house apartments and offer retail space.
Record #:
30331
Abstract:
Builders of Hope is a national, non-profit provider of affordable and workforce housing that is challenging the status quo. They transform homes in once-blighted areas to create urban, sustainable, attractive and affordable neighborhoods. Nancy Murray founded the organization in Raleigh, North Carolina, and the economic impact has been positive for working families.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 90 Issue 1, Spring 2011, p33-34, il
Record #:
32220
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many North Carolina firms are producing pre-built housing, which represent the latest development in low-cost modern housing. The change they are bringing in the industry has caused the North Carolina Mobile Housing Institute to change its name to the North Carolina Manufactured Housing Institute. Becky L. Griffin, the Institute’s executive director, discusses how the new unit could be an answer to North Carolina’s housing shortage.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 2 Issue 11, Nov 1970, p6-7, il, por