NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


23 results for "Forest management"
Currently viewing results 16 - 23
Previous
PAGE OF 2
Record #:
26817
Author(s):
Abstract:
The U.S. Forest Service will be developing management plans for each National Forest in the next few years. These plans will address issues such as stream protection, clearcutting, soil erosion, and wildlife management. Public comment is welcome and the National Wildlife Federation has published a free guidebook to obtaining, reading and critiquing the plans.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 6, June 1981, p7, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
407
Abstract:
Eighty percent of North Carolina's timberland is privately owned and terribly mismanaged.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Fall 1979, p14-15, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
31581
Author(s):
Abstract:
Holy Mother of God Monastery in rural Granville County converted from electricity to wood as a fuel source. Led by Brother Jim, a monk at the monastery, the decision was based on economics and the desire to be more self-reliant. By taking fuel from nearby woodlands, the monks are ridding the forest of undesirable “green junk,” which includes diseased trees and undesirable species.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 12, Dec 1978, p11, por
Record #:
31608
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dan Andrews of northern Harnett County has a substantial farm operation that has taken him down two separate routes of farming and forestry. Andrews grows soybeans, corn, tobacco and small grains on his farm, and manages one-thousand acres of timber for lumber. He also receives assistance in conservation practices from the Soil Conservation Service and the North Carolina Forest Service.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 12, Dec 1977, p18, por
Record #:
9354
Abstract:
Seamster discusses how proper forestry management techniques will improve both the size and quality of deer herds and still provide for the necessary harvest of timber.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
10737
Author(s):
Abstract:
Siler profiles Peter Hanlon, who is the supervisor of North Carolina's four national forests - Croatan, Uwharrie, Pisgah, and Nantahala. He has held forestry positions in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. His domain in North Carolina stretches 450 miles east to west and includes over one million acres.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 20, Mar 1970, p10-11, 24, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
6678
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina National Forests are organized into four administrative units. Nantahala is in the southwest, Pisgah in the north, Uwharrie in the Piedmont, and Croatan in the Coastal Plain. Headquarters are in Asheville. Over a million acres of national forests provide a reserve of timber and additional assets of wildlife, watershed protection, and valuable recreation within the state. Strode discusses the demands the state's increasing population will make over the next twenty-five years on the forests' ability to provide recreation, hunting, fishing, wood, and water.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
30108
Author(s):
Abstract:
A project has been launched to stimulate rebuilding of timber resources in the southern forests. As the country looks increasingly to the southern states for forest products, the federal government will provide funds for rebuilding and maintenance of the forests.