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23 results for "Forest management"
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Record #:
26451
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Abstract:
New research on hardwood tree species has shed light on a new forest management technique developed at the Bent Creek Research and Demonstration in Asheville, North Carolina. In the two-aged stand method, trees are harvested but not clear-cut at maturity. A woody understory is then allowed to develop.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 4, Nov/Dec 1993, p13, il
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Record #:
24358
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina may be chipping away its future and forests by grinding up hardwoods for Japanese paper mills.
Record #:
11961
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Clear-cutting is a technique that allows trees to be cut then ground into wood chips on the spot. Over the past several decades this practice has gotten a bad reputation. Hart discusses benefits that come from forests that are managed by cutting timber.
Record #:
407
Abstract:
Eighty percent of North Carolina's timberland is privately owned and terribly mismanaged.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Fall 1979, p14-15, il
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Record #:
697
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An environmental donnybrook is brewing in the east as forest practices in wetlands are being scrutinized as never before.
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Record #:
3885
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Carl Schenck, manager of the Biltmore Forest, founded the nation's first forestry school in 1898. The Biltmore Forest School opened the country to the concept of forest management. Today, such new ideas as seeing forests as sustainable and as part of a larger landscape guide forestry management.
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Record #:
31608
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Abstract:
Dan Andrews of northern Harnett County has a substantial farm operation that has taken him down two separate routes of farming and forestry. Andrews grows soybeans, corn, tobacco and small grains on his farm, and manages one-thousand acres of timber for lumber. He also receives assistance in conservation practices from the Soil Conservation Service and the North Carolina Forest Service.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 12, Dec 1977, p18, por
Record #:
26817
Author(s):
Abstract:
The U.S. Forest Service will be developing management plans for each National Forest in the next few years. These plans will address issues such as stream protection, clearcutting, soil erosion, and wildlife management. Public comment is welcome and the National Wildlife Federation has published a free guidebook to obtaining, reading and critiquing the plans.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 6, June 1981, p7, il
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Record #:
21049
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Abstract:
Walker Ag Group plans to buy N.C. State's Hofmann Forest for $150 million. The North Carolina State Natural Resources Foundation, Inc. and N.C. State University's Board of Trustees of Endowment Fund co-own the 79,000 acres of forest near Jacksonville. The deal is slated to go through; however, an injunction hearing is scheduled for Tuesday, November 12th with proponents of the sale concerned about an agricultural interest group buying the forested property.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 45, Nov 2013, p11 Periodical Website
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Record #:
9354
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Seamster discusses how proper forestry management techniques will improve both the size and quality of deer herds and still provide for the necessary harvest of timber.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
40536
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Living at Linville Gorge’s cliff are plants revealing ancient ecosystems long unknown and trees a retired Appalachian State professor believes are a millennium old. Support for his perspective of cliffs, which include their ecological as well as geological aspects, is a profile of the Table Mountain Pine, in addition to plants like Rock Tripe Lichen and Mountain Golden Heather.
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Record #:
34329
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Researchers at North Carolina State University have recently begun to study vegetation management in forested filter zones to find the combination of cover types best suited to remove or cause the removal of sediments and nutrients. This research extends their work in the Tar-Pamlico Basin, which demonstrated the superiority of dense regrowth following a clear cut over the mature mixed pine-hardwood forest. Detention of sediments was improved while detention of nutrients was dramatically improved.
Record #:
5526
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Abstract:
Describes alternative management strategies for forests in Western North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 18 Issue 2, 1993, p21-24, por
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Record #:
27758
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Abstract:
NC State University wants to sell Hoffman Forest, but students, professors, and workers at the forest oppose the sale. The NC State Natural Resources Foundation has approved the sale and says it makes sense due to its inconvenient location and the money that could be earned. Those who oppose the sale say that a new buyer will be unlikely to stay true to Julius Hoffman’s vision.
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Record #:
28388
Abstract:
The Diana fritillary (Speyeria diana) is a forest-dwelling butterfly of high conservation concern in North Carolina. Observations of the Diana fritillary butterfly are reported in a burned oak-pine forest in the Bald Mountains of North Carolina. Burning may be an important management tool for enhancing the habitat of this species.