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52 results for Williams, Robert L
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Record #:
1204
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When the National Textile Workers' Union targeted McDowell County for a revolt, one of the bloodiest conflicts ever to hit the mountains became reality in October of 1929 in Marion.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 4, Sept 1993, p19-21, por
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Record #:
1860
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Jock Lauterer, former journalism professor at two state colleges, once bought land in Rutherford County with the intention of creating an experimental living environment that he termed a \"commune-ity\". \"Hogwild\" was the community's official name.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 4, Sept 1994, p39-40, il
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Record #:
2517
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Marcus Layfayette Little was a no frills 19th-century educator who believed teachers taught and students learned. He started schools in Gaston, Lincoln, and Catawba Counties, one of which became Gaston College.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 2, July 1987, p24-25, il
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Record #:
2637
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South Mountain State Park in Burke County offers, in addition to scenic trails, streams, and waterfalls, an added bonus to visitors - peace and quiet.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 5, Oct 1987, p22-25, il
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Record #:
2726
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Founded in 1961 by Lily and Bud Schiele, the Schiele Museum of Natural History and Planetarium in Gastonia contains over 10,000 items, dating from pre-history to the present, and schedules activities like Indian dancing.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 8, Jan 1988, p8-11, il
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Record #:
2787
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The state's western waterfalls are some of its most spectacular scenery. Whitewater Falls, at 413 feet, located along the Jackson/Transylvania county line, is the highest one east of the Mississippi River, and Dry Falls has one of the most unusual names.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 11, Apr 1988, p14-16, il
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Record #:
2815
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Abstract:
The centerpiece of Stone Mountain State Park in Wilkes County is a 600-foot-high monadnock, or rocky mass, atop the mountain. The mass attracts rock climbers, hikers, and families who come to picnic.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 56 Issue 2, July 1988, p12-15, il
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Record #:
3079
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Although he never reached baseball's major leagues, Bob \"Red\" Ennis of Salisbury achieved one of baseball's best seasons. Pitching for the Concord Weavers in 1946, he won 23 games and lost 4, with one of history's best earned run averages, 1.05.
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Record #:
3409
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A new scenic highway opened in the western mountains in October, 1996. The Cherohala Highway, which connects Robbinsville, in Graham County, with Tellico Plains, Tennessee, provides scenic views of the Appalachian Mountains.
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Record #:
4344
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Crowders Mountain State Park in Gaston County is an example of what concerned citizens can do when a natural resource is threatened. There was a possibility in the 1970s that the 1,625-foot Crowders Mountain would be strip-mined. Local citizens responded to the threat by convincing the state to accept the peak as a state park. Funds were approved, and in October 1974, the park became a reality.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 8, Jan 1991, p36-38, il
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Record #:
6062
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North Carolina has some of the highest, most unusual, and picturesque waterfalls in the eastern United States. Almost 100 are found in the western counties in a triangle stretching from Linville to Brevard to Franklin. Williams describes a number of them, including Hickory Nut Falls, Horse Pasture, Linville Falls, and Dry Falls.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Dec 1977, p19-21, 40-41, il
Record #:
6270
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Town Creek Indian Mound, a state historic site near Mt. Gilead in Montgomery County, is one of the most important Native American sites in the area. The site represents the northernmost reach of the Mound People along the eastern seaboard. The authors discuss the activities at this on-going archaeological site.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p11-12, il
Record #:
7039
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Abstract:
Williams describes an incident of World War II having a North Carolina connection. On May 11, 1942, off the North Carolina coast, the German submarine U-558 sank HMS Bedfordshire, a British naval ship on submarine patrol. All thirty-seven British sailors were killed. Days later four bodies from the ship washed up on Ocracoke Island. Residents buried the four in a small plot. Later the United States ceded the land to England in perpetuity for one dollar. Each May memorial services are held there by military representatives from Canada, England, and the United States.
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Record #:
7746
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Abstract:
Long before the days of million dollar contracts, press agents, and television coverage, baseball was played for fun at East Monbo Park. The park was located in Iredell County between Statesville and Mooresville near a cotton mill in the early part of the 20th-century. Workers were permitted to watch the games, which were played at five o'clock in the afternoon during the week and one o'clock on Saturdays as long as someone stayed behind to keep an eye on the machines. By 1986, the park was completely under Lake Norman, but the memory of the terrific baseball played there will live on.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p7, 37
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Record #:
7859
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Thomas Alva Edison once lived in the small town of Iron Station, between Lincolnton and Stanley, North Carolina. While Charlotte Frances Reinhardt Puckett's father was visiting Charlotte, became such close friends with Edison that Mr. Reinhardt invited him to live with his family. Edison was consumed with ideas about preserving sound, light, and finding alternate sources of fuel for automobiles. When Edison move back to New Jersey, he sent the family a “talking machine,” despite Mrs. Reinhart's implications that he was talking foolishness for such a thing to be accomplished.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 9, Feb 1987, p15,27, il
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