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9 results for Mobley, Joe A
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Record #:
16236
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After 125 years, the Civil War continued to ignite curiosity and passion for Americans. Mobley reflects on the amount of Civil War topics presented in books, journals, and pop culture and why Americans remained fascinated with this particular American conflict.
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Record #:
16855
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In 1961, the USS North Carolina was decommissioned and towed from New Jersey to Wilmington, North Carolina. It has remained docked at the mouth of the Cape Fear River since and nearly six million visitors have justified saving the World War II battleship from the scrapyard.
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Record #:
16860
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MIC is an acronym for the Mecklenburg Investment Company, an organization established in May 1921. A group of prominent black citizens in Charlotte formed MIC to rent space to other professional black professionals. These men were known at the time as the \"New Negro\" because of their middle-class, educated, and urban standing in the post-Civil War South.
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Record #:
21490
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The town of Princeville (until 1885, Freedom Hill) was a self-segregated black town in Edgecombe County that experienced a good degree of growth and economic prosperity between 1865 and 1915. During Reconstruction, Princeville residents found economic success through a blend of agricultural and non-agricultural employment. During the agricultural depression of the 1880s, the town benefited from the surrounding area's industrial industry. A high percentage of Princeville residents were employed in service and labor jobs in nearby industrial centers. This steady employment for its citizens helped grow Princeville's government, schools, and churches.
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Record #:
21646
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This article examines Zebulon B. Vance's re-election campaign for governor of North Carolina during the Civil War in 1864. Vance was originally against Southern succession but by 1864 he was convinced that the Confederate cause was necessary for the continuation of the Southern way of life. His campaign was built around his commitment to Confederate nationalism and ultimately he was successful in his reelection.
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Record #:
16153
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Torpedo junction referred to the state's Atlantic coastline. Before Germany declared war on the United States, Germany's U-boats were successfully sinking commercial vessels for a six month period before the country could retaliate. From December 1941 to April 1942, U-boats operated with tragic precision, torpedoed an estimated 87 ships off the state's coast.
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Record #:
4525
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John Futch, New Hanover county farmer, husband, and father, joined the Confederate Army in February 1862. He fought at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, where his brother Charley was killed. Futch wrote a number of letters to his wife describing his hardships, weakness in spirit after the Gettysburg defeat and Charley's death, and his wanting to come home. Futch was shot for desertion on September 3, 1863.
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Record #:
4891
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Zebulon B. Vance was governor of North Carolina during the Civil War. He commanded the Twenty-sixth Regiment of North Carolina Troops at the battles of New Bern and Malvern Hill, prior to his election in 1862. He was an ardent nationalist and supported the Confederacy to the war's end. It was this steadfastness to the state that won him reelection in 1864 over peace candidate William W. Holden. Vance was again elected governor from 1877 to 1879 and then served as a U.S. Senator till his death in 1894.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p21-23, il
Record #:
2758
Abstract:
Nine county courthouses built between 1899 and 1913 in the central and western sections of the state seem to be based on one architectural plan - that of the Iredell County Courthouse, designed by Louis E. Schwend.
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