NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Knapp, Richard F
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
5990
Author(s):
Abstract:
The outbreak of World War II caught the United States short of cargo ships to send vital war supplies to the Allies, along with a means to protect them. Knapp discusses shipbuilding in the state during the war, particularly in Wilmington where 243 ships were constructed. He also discusses the blimp station in Weeksville in Pasquotank County, where the lighter-than-air aircraft that patrolled the Atlantic for submarines were based.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
7174
Author(s):
Abstract:
Harnett County native General William C. Lee earned the title of “Father of the Airborne,” for his pioneer work in developing the Army's paratrooper program. Having seen paratroopers in foreign countries, General Lee worked hard during the 1930s and 1940s to convince the U.S. military to develop a fighting paratrooper program. He was successful. On the night of June 5, 1944, 10,000 paratroopers of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions parachuted into France at the start of the Normandy Invasion. General Lee was not among them, having suffered a heart attack in April, but as each trooper jumped, he shouted, \"Bill Lee!\"
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p24-27, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
8220
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joseph Montfort was a prominent man in colonial North Carolina. He was a clerk of the Halifax County Court, a member of the North Carolina colonial Assembly, a colonel in the militia, and a treasurer of the northern counties of the colony. In 1771 he was named Provincial Grand Master of America by the English Masonic order, the highest office an American has held in the Masonic organization. Montfort built his home in the town of Halifax on lot 52. This fashionable home existed till 1872, when it burnt down. The site was then covered with dirt and used for cotton farming. In 1972, the lot was found again using C. J. Sauthier's 1769 map. Archaeological excavations on the site began in 1978 and continued in 1979. The original foundation was uncovered, along with 1,600 other artifacts. Today a museum sits over the archaeological site. Visitors can view the foundation and other artifacts as well as tour the thirty-two-acre historic Halifax district.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p22-24, por
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
21566
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1878 and 1890, the W. Duke, Sons and Company became the de facto controller of cigarette manufacturing in the United States. Through the leadership of James Buchanan Duke, the company aggressively utilized sales promotions and attractive advertising, while also controlling the cigarette rolling machines, first patented in the late 1870s and 1880s. In 1890, Duke also convinced his four major competitors to join him in forming the American Tobacco Company, which was subsequently labeled 'tobacco trust.'
Source:
Record #:
16075
Author(s):
Abstract:
Conrad Reed is credited with finding the state's first trace of gold in 1799 on his father's farm in Cabarrus County. Amateur endeavors to retrieve gold persisted until 1854, when a professional miner from Mexico's silver mines and streamlined the operation. The last underground mining operation ended in 1911 and since any interest has continued with minor panning operations.
Source:
Full Text: