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3 results for Carraway, Richard J
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Record #:
6820
Abstract:
North Carolina has had many memorable hurricanes, including Hazel, Diane, and Floyd; but the '33 Storm, as it is called, seems to top them all. The storm struck Carteret County on September 15, 1933. It lingered at least twelve hours, with gusts at 120 to 140 miles per hour. The massive storm spawned many tornadoes, and at its height, over half of Carteret County was under water. Carraway describes the storm and includes a listing of each Down East town and the damage it sustained.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 19 Issue 2, Winter 2003, p3-6, il
Record #:
34674
Abstract:
Frank Salisbury was editor of the Morehead City newspaper between 1924 and 1964. A photographer and founder of the Carteret County Historical Society, Salisbury was interested in preserving and documenting Carteret County’s heritage, both historic and modern. He made an effort to record many historic structures in town, and was a well published author on the history of Morehead City.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p6-10, il
Record #:
34687
Abstract:
Exploring Garbacon Creek and the Neuse River during his youth, Richard Carraway Jr. discovered various historic artifacts, including pottery, glass bottles, arrowheads, and clay pipes. On occasion, human remains would wash out of the riverbank prompting a visit from local archaeologists. Carraway would explore these sites and found arrowheads in association with human remains, leading to the assumption that the site was associated with warring Native American factions. As erosion increased, however, Carraway found evidence of wooden coffins suggesting the burials were remains of European colonists killed in the Tuscarora uprising of 1711. Since his childhood, Carraway has continued to study the site and the history of the associated Garbacon plantation.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spring 2003, p12-14, il