NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for Butler, Lindley S
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1966
Author(s):
Abstract:
Structures related to shallow river navigation, such as wing dams and sluice walls, are depicted in this photographic essay.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 3, Oct 1993, p17-19, il
Record #:
2193
Author(s):
Abstract:
Prior to 1662 there were no accurate maps of the Carolina coast from Cape Lookout to Port Royal Sound. Six voyages of exploration between 1662 and 1667 added detailed descriptions of previously unknown areas to existing maps.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 4, Oct 1994, p21-29, il, f
Record #:
8677
Author(s):
Abstract:
On September 12, 1781, loyalist partisan Colonel David Fanning and his militia surrounded the temporary state capital, Hillsborough. The one-thousand-man force successfully captured state officers, army officials, and Governor Thomas Burke. While Fanning marched his men to loyalist stronghold Wilmington, Whig general John Butler quickly assembled 400 militia at the mill of Quaker Thomas Lindley to block Fanning. The Whigs were overpowered, however, and the loyalists were able to deliver their prisoners to Major James H. Craig in Wilmington.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 5, Oct 1981, p12-13, il, map
Full Text:
Record #:
9938
Author(s):
Abstract:
On August 13, 1972, a monument was rededicated at Speedwell Furnace, the colonial ironworks on Troublesome Creek in Rockingham County. Speedwell Furnace was an important county location for nearly 150 years, serving as a crossroad store, polling place and grist mill. Its statewide historical significance stems from its use as a bivouac during General Nathaniel Greene's southern campaign, which led to the final defeat of the British at Yorktown.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 13, Dec 1972, p8-10, il, map
Full Text:
Record #:
10642
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wright Tavern, located in the picturesque village of Wentworth, the county seat of Rockingham County, stands today as a unique record of travel in the 19th-century. Famed for its hospitality and good food, the courthouse tavern served senators, congressmen, governors, judges, and the people of the upper Piedmont. The tavern was constructed around 1810 by William Wright as an addition to a late 18th-century salt box house which was retained for a time as the innkeeper's quarters. The tavern was selected to become the first restoration project for the Rockingham County Historical Society who sponsored an archaeological excavation in conjunction with the State Department of Archives and History and the faculty and students of Rockingham Community College.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 16, Jan 1971, p19-20, il
Full Text:
Record #:
17736
Author(s):
Abstract:
River navigation was invaluable during the 18th- and 19th-century throughout the state and remains an understudied aspect of maritime culture. The Dan River serves as a case study to demonstrate the range of riverine activities from canals, to fish dams, and the movement of goods and people. Dan River is a tributary of the larger Roanoke and opened a rich agricultural area for commerce.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 3, Oct 1993, p11-16, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17744
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the War of 1812, Otway Burns successfully raided British ship in American waters. Burns commanded the Snap Dragon and often sailing from Beaufort and Swansboro with a crew of as many as 75 men. The author challenges the generally accepted figures for Burns' war time prizes and questions the credibility of sources previously used.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 8, Oct 1998, p7-17, il
Record #:
21015
Author(s):
Abstract:
Utilizing the Thurmond Chatham collection of documents, available since 1956 and the then recent initiation of a survey and inventorying of North Carolina Colonial Records, this article seeks to accurately update and correct discrepancies discovered in the previously accepted list and histories of the 17th century governors of Albemarle County.
Source: