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22 results for "Snelson, Franklin F"
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Record #:
8135
Abstract:
The brown water snake is harmless, but its bad temper, heavy body, and large flattened head make it appear dangerous. It is the largest of all the water snakes and has a maximum length of five feet. North Carolina's largest specimen measured fifty-seven inches in length. The brown water snake is very abundant along lakes and sluggish waterways of the Coastal Plain. It has a tendency to climb trees and bushes, often to a height of fifteen feet or more. The snake's food consists mostly of fishes.
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Record #:
8315
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The canebrake rattlesnake is one of the most impressive and colorful of all the eastern rattlesnakes. It commonly attains a length of almost five feet. In North Carolina it is found most frequently in the low grounds and pocosins of the Coastal Plain. Breeding occurs in the spring, and the young are born alive. Small mammals make up the main food of this snake.
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Record #:
8170
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The Carolina pygmy rattlesnake is characterized by its small size, tiny rattle, and typical pit viper appearance. Its coloration is highly variable, running the gamut from gray to brick red. Most adult snakes measure around eighteen inches, but a few approaching two feet have been found in North Carolina. Its preferred habitat is in the Sandhills and southeastern part of the state.
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Record #:
8066
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The eastern garter snake is one of the most common and widely distributed of all the state's snakes. Its coloration is typically some shade of olive, green, or brown with three longitudinal yellowish stripes along its sides. It is seldom found far from moist areas, and its food consists primarily of earthworms, insects, small fish, frogs, toads, and salamanders. It is one of the most prolific species in the state, often producing fifty or more living young during the breeding season.
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Record #:
6833
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The eastern hognose snake is found mostly in the coastal plain and piedmont, although it has been reported in the mountains as high as 3,000 feet. This snake is known by a number of names, including spreading adder, puff adder, and cornfield adder. What sets it apart from other snakes is the flat, slightly upturned snout. The hognose has an extremely variable coloration and is harmless to man.
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Record #:
8173
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The northern water snake is harmless to man, but it is often killed by fishermen and others who believe it to be dangerous. In the state this species is found primarily in the Piedmont and in the mountains at an elevation up to 3,500 feet. Its favorite habitats are streams, rivers, lakes, and farm ponds. The water snake, a beneficial predator, prefers amphibians and fishes for food. It is of prime importance in controlling fish populations and preventing small specimens from completely taking over a water area.
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Record #:
6813
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The brown snake is one of the most abundant species in North Carolina. Its secretiveness, coloration, and small size make it difficult to observe. This snake inhabits both rural and urban areas and is harmless to man.
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Record #:
8067
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This species of snake has as many vernacular names as color-pattern variations. In North Carolina it is known as the highland moccasin, pilot, poplar-leaf, white oak and red oak. In coastal areas it is often confused with the corn snake. The copperhead accounts for 90 percent of all the venomous snake bites in the state, but its bite is seldom fatal. It can be considered a beneficial snake because part of its diet consists of mice and small rodents. Breeding usually occurs in the spring and three to twelve young are produced.
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Record #:
6784
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The corn snake is a member of the well-known Rat Snake Family. Because of its markings, it is said to be the most beautiful snake in North America. It is found across North Carolina but is most abundant in the coastal plain. Rodents are the chief food item. The name “corn snake” comes from the fact that it is often found in corn and other grain fields providing beneficial rodent control. It is one of the most valuable of all harmless snakes.
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Record #:
8095
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Cottonmouths are very dangerous snakes, and their bite can be fatal. Their distribution in the state is generally limited to permanent or semi-permanent bodies of water in the Coastal Plain. This species breeds in the spring, and their young are born alive. Coloration is variable and ranges through shades of brown, olive, and sometimes yellowish. Their average length is around four feet. When aroused, the cottonmouth's rapidly vibrating tail and gaping mouth readily distinguish it from harmless water snakes.
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Record #:
8065
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The eastern coachwhip attains the greatest length of any North Carolina snake. The largest one ever recorded measured seven feet nine inches. It prefers dry areas of sand, pine, and scrub oak, and is found mostly in the Sandhills region. In the Coastal Plain it ranges as far north as Carteret and Craven Counties. This snake feeds on small mammals, birds and their eggs, and smaller snakes. Because it is elusive, there is very little known about the snake's young or its breeding habits in the state.
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Record #:
8318
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This poisonous snake is identified by shiny rings of red, yellow, and black, completely encircling its body, a black snout, and the contact of red and yellow rings. Its habitat in the state is in the southeastern Coastal Plain. It is an elusive snake, and very little is known of its breeding habits or its young. Small snakes and lizards make up the main part of its diet.
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Record #:
8198
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The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is the largest and most impressive of all the venomous snakes in North Carolina. Adults measure between four and five feet, but some exceed six feet in length. This snake lives mostly in the Coastal Plain and is slow to retreat when its habitat is invaded. Its diet consists of rabbits and other small mammals.
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Record #:
6788
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The eastern kingsnake is one of the most colorful and best known of North Carolina's snakes. Except for the higher mountain regions, it is found throughout the state. It is an efficient predator of small rodents and a notorious, indiscriminate eater of other snakes, both venomous and harmless alike.
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Record #:
6782
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One of North Carolina's largest snakes is the pine snake, which can attain a maximum length of over six feet. It is easily recognized by its whitish coloration and brown or rust-colored blotches down its back and by its loud hissing when disturbed. Because it feeds mostly upon rats, mice, and other small mammals, it is considered a beneficial species.
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