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5 results for Poisonous snakes
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Record #:
6595
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seven species of poisonous snakes inhabit North Carolina. These divide into two groups: the coral snake, which is a group of one, and pit vipers, which include the copperhead, water moccasin, massasauga, and the pigmy, diamondback, timber, and canebrake rattlesnakes. Amundson briefly describes the snakes and discusses their habits.
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Record #:
8095
Abstract:
Cottonmouths are very dangerous snakes, and their bite can be fatal. Their distribution in the state is generally limited to permanent or semi-permanent bodies of water in the Coastal Plain. This species breeds in the spring, and their young are born alive. Coloration is variable and ranges through shades of brown, olive, and sometimes yellowish. Their average length is around four feet. When aroused, the cottonmouth's rapidly vibrating tail and gaping mouth readily distinguish it from harmless water snakes.
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Record #:
8318
Abstract:
This poisonous snake is identified by shiny rings of red, yellow, and black, completely encircling its body, a black snout, and the contact of red and yellow rings. Its habitat in the state is in the southeastern Coastal Plain. It is an elusive snake, and very little is known of its breeding habits or its young. Small snakes and lizards make up the main part of its diet.
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Record #:
8634
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is home to thirty-eight species of snakes. Six of them are poisonous. The state has the highest number of poisonous snake bites in the country. Knowing these six by sight and by their habits will help an individual avoid being bitten. The six are the eastern coral snake, cottonmouth, copperhead, eastern diamondback rattlesnake, pigmy rattlesnake, and timber rattlesnake.
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Record #:
2460
Author(s):
Abstract:
Found in swamps and other freshwater habitats in the Sandhills and the Coastal Plain, the cottonmouth moccasin is a dangerous snake and best left alone. The largest eastern cottonmouth ever measured, caught in the Dismal Swamp, was over six feet.
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