NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


37 results for "Rumley, Vail Stewart"
Currently viewing results 16 - 30
Previous
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
21981
Abstract:
Blue crabs are an important part of the state's commercial fishing industry, contributing $30 million a year. Many of the crabs caught in the Pamlico River are brought to the Crab Ranch on North Creek near Bath where they are graded by size. However, in the past seventeen years crabbing has declined. At its 1996 peak, over eight million pounds of blue crabs were caught in the Pamlico, but in 2011, slightly less than 3 million pounds were brought. Hurricanes seem to be the culprit as they have disrupted blue crab habitats.
Full Text:
Record #:
21985
Abstract:
Ghosts and legends fill the Ghost Walk in Bath; most are connected with the town or surrounding area. Ghost Walkers learn about Jesse Elliot, who could not resist a drink or a bet, and did so on a Sunday much to his regret; the unforgettable pirate Blackbeard; Edna Ferber, who gathered material for her book, Showboat; and the Rev. George Whitfield, who placed a curse on the town for 100 years.
Full Text:
Record #:
21988
Abstract:
Rumley recounts the history of Gerrard Chapel Primitive Baptist Church in Blount's Creek. The church was established in 1808, but closed its doors in the 1970s after members moved on to larger, newer churches.
Full Text:
Record #:
21982
Abstract:
Debbie Wilkins owns the Crab Ranch and Debra's Soft Crabs, Inc. near Bath. She has been in business thirty years and is known from New Jersey to Florida as Queen of the Soft Crabs. Wilkins describes how her business operates.
Full Text:
Record #:
21987
Abstract:
Rumley recounts the history of Washington's O. Henry Book Club, which, in December 2013, turned 100 years old.
Record #:
21995
Abstract:
Jeffrey Jakub grew up in a rough Newark, N.J. neighborhood. Early on he had a passion for art, watercolor especially, which continued through high school and at the Newark School of Fine and Industrial Art. He had a career as a commercial illustrator, but also continued his fine art. His painting earned him the American Watercolor Society's signature membership as well as numerous other awards. While visiting Southern colleges with his wife and son, they stopped in Washington, saw a sign for Pamlico Plantation, and decided this was the place for them.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
22760
Abstract:
Washington's West Main Street is known for its historic homes, but the Leach home is often overlooked despite its history. The history and architecture of the home, its modern updates, the current residents, and the residents' style of holiday decoration are covered in the article.
Full Text:
Record #:
23850
Abstract:
The Hackney family has been in the transportation business in some capacity since the fourteenth century. The family and a version of their company originated in England, but the family's activities in eastern North Carolina are the focus of this article. Hackney Brothers Inc. in Wilson is the focus of this article. Hackney Brothers Inc. in Wilson once dominated the bugging making industry. In the twentieth century, the Washington branch, Hackney and Sons, Inc. made its mark with delivery vehicles. The company now specializes in the manufacture of fire and rescue trucks.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
24772
Abstract:
During World War II, Beaufort County began broadcasting US news and information to countries in South America, Central America, and Africa through the Voice of America radio station. Voice of America was an important way to communicate to these other countries during the war and especially during the 1950s, gaining it national renown. The station continued to operate with sites in both Beaufort and Pitt Counties until 2006 when the signal permanently went down.
Full Text:
Record #:
26916
Abstract:
In May 2016, Bath celebrated 300 years of seaport history. In 1716, England’s Lords Proprietors designated Bath as an official seaport, paving the way for hundreds of years of history. Although the town is no longer a busy port, it still celebrated its history with reenactments and costumed interpreters.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
28785
Abstract:
Bath Creek Stables is an educational facility where children can learn to ride, learn animal husbandry, and responsibility. The successful stable owned by the Preston family is a place where the Beaufort County 4-H students can practice what they learn. The stable and its place in the local community are profiled.
Record #:
28784
Abstract:
A photojournal explores the history of Washington, NC through its architecture, landmarks, and notable artifacts. The Civil War bell at the First Presbyterian church, the Buckman’s Department Store Elevator, the Vaudeville Theater at Turnage Theatre, and the Old Courthouse are a few of the items and places highlighted for their history.
Record #:
34403
Abstract:
The Washington Garden Club meets once a month to share their gardening experiences and ideas with one another. Organized by women in 1941, it became a federated club, National Garden Club, and the Garden Club of North Carolina, Inc., and is now a very strong and active organization. Each May, they host a plant sale at the North Carolina Estuarium, with proceeds supporting the club’s gardens at the Market and Gladden street intersection.
Source:
Record #:
36149
Abstract:
A former vaudeville theater located upstairs in Washington's Turnage Theater may be one of the best of its kind still in existence according Emily Rebert, the City of Washington's community development planner and also master's candidate at Savannah College of Art and Design. It is hoped Rebert's work will lead to funding opportunities for restoration.
Record #:
37305
Abstract:
A common Southern tradition became personal through intergenerational bonding happening while the Boyd family prepared hog meat for various dishes. Bonding between neighbors at what Doug Boyd called “The Village of Yesteryear,” a collection of buildings where the activity took place, is what made a common activity a builder of community.