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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for "Rights, Douglas L."
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Record #:
19679
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Images of the American West often contained herds of bison, but some historic accounts identified buffalo within the region that would become North Carolina. Several sources from John Lawson and Dr. John Brickell were studied for evidence of buffalo in the state, especially in the western mountain portion of the territory.
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Record #:
19747
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This article looks at the colonial roots of the Trading Path, an extremely popular travel and trade route through North Carolina that would later become the route for a system of 20th century highways. The article utilizes period accounts of exploration and travel along the path as well as descriptions of encounters with various Indian tribes with a particular focus on the travels of surveyor John Lawson, traders James Needham and Gabriel Arthur, and explorer John Lederer.
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Record #:
19780
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The Horse Society was a combination protective agency, insurance company, and fraternal order founded on November 10, 1798 in the Winston-Salem area. Members could pay the group to protect personal items from everyday thieves, a flourishing business model until 1874 when expenditures exceeded revenue and the society disbanded. Documents belonging to the society are now stored at the Wachovia Historical Society and some of which are reprinted in this article.
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Record #:
20121
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Salem was founded by the Moravians, an austere religious organization, who believed in peace rather than bearing arms. Prior to the American Civil War, the town and its community made some exceptions to its rules, and a militia was formed and sent into battle. The church also lost influence over the town as more non-Moravians were permitted to settle in Salem, changing community dynamics. The author looks at how the excesses of antebellum Salem and hardships of war changed the once rigidly religious community during the mid-19th century.
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Record #:
20433
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Adelaide Fries was born in Salem on November 12, 1871 and did on November 29, 1949. The author writes a brief memorial to her life and especially focuses on her career as a historian and writer. The final two pages of the article outline the various publications she wrote, edited, and collaborated on, most dealing with North Carolina, Salem, and the Moravians.
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Record #:
22562
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Although few early written accounts of Indians in the Piedmont region of North Carolina exist, there are traces of the native populations that have been left behind. The Saponi, Tutelo, and especially the Catawba were strong tribes in the Piedmont region, as seen through relics and remains such as stone implements, pottery, arrows, and even graves.
Record #:
18672
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Rights examines the route of the first explorers who ventured into central North Carolina in hopes of trade with the Native Americans.
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