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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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26 results for "Pusser, Todd"
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Record #:
22393
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Located in Columbus County, Lake Waccamaw covers an area of 9,000 square acres along with 14 miles of cypress-lined shoreline. It is the third-largest natural lake in the state, but its depth only averages 3 feet. It is a place of great diversity, both in and out of the water. In the forest and swamps surrounding Waccamaw are Prothonotary warblers, black bear, pine lily, river otters, Venus flytraps, spotted turtles and brown water snakes. Also in the lake's waters there are three endemics--three small species of fish--that are found nowhere else on the planet. They are a darter, a killfish, and a silverside. Adding to the diversity, the skull of an extinct right whale 2.5 million-year-old was found in 2007.
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36163
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In the briny deep of the Outer Banks and waterways such as streams was a diversity of tropic and cool water life. This diversity’s attribution was in part to the Labrador Current and Gulf Stream. Displaying the diversity were the ocean’s sand tiger sharks and nettle jellyfish, the river’s largemouth bass and waterdog.
Record #:
27668
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Bluefin Tuna is an extraordinary fish that is among the world’s most endangered species. This article discusses the Bluefin’s way of life, its habitat, and migration patterns.
Record #:
25521
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In 1934, Herbert Brimley examined remains of a whale shark found in Carolina Beach, North Carolina. Despite an increase of knowledge since that discovery, still not much is known about whale sharks. Scientists do not know where whale sharks give birth, or how many are in the ocean, or even how long they live.
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Record #:
34719
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Whale sharks are occasional visitors to the coast of North Carolina, especially when warmer-than-average water travels up from the south. In 1934, a whale shark larger than 40 feet long was found dead in the Cape Fear River; Herbert Hutchinson Brimley, affiliate of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, was able to record the tail and create part of an exhibition. Since then, the whale shark has become a much more active part of the North Carolina ecosystem.
Record #:
7365
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Herpetologists catch and study reptiles and amphibians, and for the past twenty years, this has been Jeff Beane's career. Beane, the Herpetology Collections Manager at the North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh, received a degree in zoology from North Carolina State University in 1982. He discusses how his interest in this area developed and his current job activities.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p30-32, 34, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23920
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Red-tailed Hawks are common throughout North Carolina, even in the state's large cities. The birds are spectacular and seem to be increasing in number, but are still in danger of birds-of-prey hunters.
Record #:
9121
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Eastern fox squirrels are the largest tree squirrels in the western hemisphere, weighing up to three pounds and having a body the size of a house cat. They are also strikingly colored in silver, gray, and black. In North Carolina they are an uncommon species, and development has taken much of their habitat in the longleaf pine forests of the Southeastern Coastal Plain. For that reason the North Carolina Natural Heritage Program has placed them on its watch list.
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Record #:
7489
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The ruby-throated hummingbird is the most familiar of the species to North Carolinians. It is the only hummingbird that breeds east of the Mississippi River. Over the past decade a dozen other kinds of hummingbirds have been seen in North Carolina and in an unusual season--winter. What is not clear is whether the winter ranges of some hummingbirds are expanding or whether the birds have always been here in winter and not been noticed. The rufous hummingbird is the most abundant of the winter sightings. Pusser discusses the research on winter hummingbirds by bird biologist Susan Campbell, who is the only North Carolinian with a permit to band hummingbirds.
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Record #:
8517
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The robust redhorse is a unique member of a family of fishes known as suckers. This fish had not been seen in the state's waterways for over 120 years until one was caught in the Pee Dee River in 1985, near Rockingham. Fifteen years would pass before another redhorse was captured in 2000. Pusser describes a survey of the Pee Dee River south of Richmond County to the South Carolina state line. The purpose was to locate other redhorses and to gain some insight about the their population and range. Pusser relates what was discovered.
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Record #:
23073
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North Carolina is home to a variety of insects, fish, birds, and other animals that perform amazing natural spectacles. Tourists travel hundreds of miles to see such spectacles, but one only needs to know when and where to look to see nature at its finest.
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Record #:
23946
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The Albemarle Peninsula is a wetland located between the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds. The peninsula covers 3,200 square miles of land in five different counties. The wetland environment is home to a variety of wildlife, including bobcats, black bears, red wolves, tundra swans, river otters, snake species, and the American Alligator, among others.
Record #:
19713
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There is little documentation on the nesting behavior of the Northern Pine Snake outside of the New Jersey Barrens. The authors describe two natural Pine Snake nests located in the North Carolina Sandhills.
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Record #:
16814
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In this ongoing series, Pusser has highlighted the unique diversity of life found within the state's borders. In this segment he focuses on birds. Scientists currently recognize over 10,150 species worldwide. Of that number North Carolina claims 460 species which are either permanent or seasonal residents.
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Record #:
14323
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The world's waters contain almost 32,000 species of fish. There are 235 freshwater species living in North Carolina waters, including six that are found nowhere else in the world. It is uncertain how many marine species are found here. Pusser highlights some of the unique diversity.
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