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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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26 results for "Maurer, Allan"
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Record #:
9319
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Abstract:
North Carolina has outstanding health care systems that offer unique and innovative programs, specialized centers, and firsts, like robotic surgery at Pitt County Memorial Hospital. However, it is no longer enough for hospitals to have the latest in care and technology; they have to let prospective patients know what is available. Maurer discusses marketing strategies hospitals use.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30-32, il
Record #:
7587
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Abstract:
Hospital wellness programs help their own employees and those of regional businesses focus on healthy lifestyles, which include healthy eating, exercise, and disease management. Maurer examines wellness programs: WakeMed's, which began in 1986, in Raleigh; Duke University Medical Center's program, now in operation for twenty-one years, in Durham; and Mission Hospital's, which began eight years ago, in Asheville.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 1, Jan 2006, p12, 14-20, il
Record #:
7658
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Abstract:
Bill Johnson, president and COO of Progress Energy Inc., is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine executive profile. Johnson has served the company in a number of capacities since 1992, including group president for energy delivery, president and CEO for Progress Energy Service.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 2, Feb 2006, p42-45, por
Record #:
7724
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Methodist College (Fayetteville), North Carolina State University (Raleigh), Campbell University (Buies Creek), and Queens College (Charlotte) offer professional golf management majors aimed at preparing students at careers as golf professionals. The programs combine business, liberal arts, and golf course work. The Professional Golfers Association requires graduates to pass a player ability test since much golf management includes teaching golf lessons. All four programs have substantial internship requirements of sixteen months.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 3, Mar 2006, p34-36, il
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Record #:
7729
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The Pinehurst Golf Fitness Lab, located at the Pinehurst Golf Resort, opened in July 2005. The lab evolved from sports fitness research conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The lab uses sophisticated analysis of a golfer's swing to help improve balance, strength, flexibility, and technique. A biomechanical analysis, four-hour session at the fitness lab, and hour-long lesson costs $850.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 3, Mar 2006, p40-41, il
Record #:
7830
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Abstract:
Western Carolina University's new Institute for the Economy and the Future (IEF) opened in September 2005. It is intended to be a “think and do tank” that will boost the region's economy in a number of ways. It will conduct research, policy analysis, polling surveys, and employment trend analysis, not only to promote regional economic development, for also for paying clients.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 5, May 2006, p28, il
Record #:
8028
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Abstract:
Since 2003, Alleghany County has experienced an economic downturn, and over 2,000 jobs have been lost in the rural area. To spur the economy, county officials are planning to build a $10 million teapot museum in Sparta. Projections from a national firm hired to evaluate the museum's prospects are that the museum would attract 61,000 people annually, add $7.5 million in tourist revenue, and increase local sales and occupancy taxes by $250,000. The schedule for the opening of 300,000-square-foot-building is 2008.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 8, Aug 2006, p7, il
Record #:
8097
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Abstract:
Business incentives offered by the state of North Carolina and local governments have been successful in bringing major new companies to North Carolina and in expanding current businesses. Besides the tax breaks, businesses are attracted by the state's trained workforce; strategic proximities to major highways, airports, and seaports; and lifestyle amenities. Maurer discusses the state's top ten economic development projects and the top five development projects in each of state's seven regional districts. The top economic development project is Fidelity Investments plan to create 2,000 jobs and invest $100 million to build a new facility in the Research Triangle Park.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 9, Sept 2006, p44, 46-48, 50-56, il
Record #:
8311
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Abstract:
Biotechnology is the most coveted industry in the world, and competition to attract it is very high. In 2006, the N.C. Biotechnology Center completed its plan to increase the industry statewide by opening satellite offices. The Piedmont Triad, the East, Southeast, West, and Charlotte now all have their own biotech directors. Each of these satellite offices seeks to involve regional leaders in creating and implementing a biotech vision. Maurer examines developments in these satellite regions. The states ranks third nationally in biotechnology.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 11, Nov 2006, p23-24, 28, 30-31, 34-41, il
Record #:
8312
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Abstract:
North Carolina is becoming a biotech state rather than just a state with a biotech hub. This can be observed in the development of biotech research parks from Kannapolis to Harnett County, as well as marine research facilities on the coast. Maurer examines developments at some of the research parks.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 11, Nov 2006, p26-27, il
Record #:
7048
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Abstract:
Maurer discusses Cary's growth as a center for amateur sports in the state and nation. The state amateur games are scheduled there for 2005 and 2006. Over 12,000 athletes and coaches will come, plus hordes of spectators. USA Baseball is opening four fields in Cary to train players for the World Cup, Pan Am, and Olympic games in 2008. Other sports facilities and events include the SAS Soccer Park, the thirty-court Cary Tennis Center, the Jimmy V Celebrity Golf Classic, and cross-country running courses. Sporting activities have a huge impact on the city's economy, attracting people to hotels, shopping centers, and restaurants.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 1, Jan 2005, p28-29, il
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Record #:
7047
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Cary is North Carolina's seventh largest city with 107,000 residents and 6,000 businesses. In 2004, MONEY MAGAZINE designated the town as the best place to live on the East Coast. Above average home prices, residents with above average incomes (median $75,000), and a high percentage of residents with college degrees (67 percent) were demographics the magazine selected in making their selection. Maurer discusses this city that chose smart growth and culture over urban sprawl and still doubled its population every decade since 1960.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 1, Jan 2005, p23-24, 26, 30-34, il
Record #:
7169
Author(s):
Abstract:
James Speed, Jr., did so well as a CPA that he retired at age 46. He had to be coaxed back to work in 2003 as CEO and president of the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company. Speed has plans to take the company to new levels. He wants the company to become one of the nation's top 150 insurance companies in terms of gross premiums. In three years the company has moved from $70 million to $140 million annually.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 4, Apr 2005, p48-51, por
Record #:
7243
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Abstract:
David Jordan Whichard, III, publisher of Cox North Carolina Publications, Inc., and publisher of the Greenville Daily Reflector, is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine executive profile. Whichard was recently named chair of the North Carolina Economic Development Board.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p54-57, por
Record #:
7271
Author(s):
Abstract:
David P. Rizzo, president and CEO of NC IDEA, is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine executive profile. Rizzo founded and sold Charlotte software company Osprey. He served as president and CEO of MCNC, the Micro-electronic Center of North Carolina. As head of NC IDEA, he oversees plans to seed fund early-stage technology companies in North Carolina.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 7, July 2005, p45-48, por