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3 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 50 Issue 5, May 1986
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Record #:
8654
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The decline in water quality of the Pamlico River and Sound, the second largest estuary in the country, threatens fish populations and the livelihoods of many fishermen. Two major industries using the lands along the water system are agriculture and forestry. Both contribute to the estuary's problems. Taylor examines the sources of the pollution, both nonpoint and point, and what can be done to control them.
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Record #:
8656
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Abstract:
At least forty species of warblers either visit or nest in North Carolina; however, they are among the hardest birds to find and to identify. Warblers are all the same size and come in a confusing array of colors and share similar field marks and songs. Warbler watching can become easier; vegetation, climate, and geography are clues to the type of warbler to be found in a particular location. Some warblers are restricted to types of vegetation growth. Most of the warblers winter in the tropics. Lee discusses a number of warblers and locations for viewing them.
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Record #:
8655
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Abstract:
There are three species of weasels in North America--the least, long-tailed, and short-tailed. Only the least and long-tail are found in North Carolina. Long-tails are found statewide, but least weasels confine their activities to the mountain counties. Primarily nocturnal, weasels are rarely seen. In northern climes the weasel's coat changes from brown and white in summer to all white in winter. In North Carolina the creature keeps the brown and white color year-round. The adult least weasel is the world's smallest carnivorous mammal.
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