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5 results for Water Resources Research Institute News Vol. Issue 270, July/Aug 1991
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Record #:
34199
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed in June a 1990 District Court’s finding that the Army Corps of Engineers properly considered the permit they issued for construction of the Lake Gaston-Virginia Beach pipeline. The City of Virginia Beach filed another suit in the Eastern District Court of North Carolina seeking to overturn a law passed only days earlier by the North Carolina General Assembly. The recent bill created a new statute mandating certain conditions under which water is withdrawn from any major river or reservoir.
Record #:
34198
Author(s):
Abstract:
In its latest biennial report on water quality in North Carolina, the Water Quality Section of the Division of Environmental Management reports that sixty-four-percent of the state’s streams and rivers fully support their recreational uses. Agricultural runoff is identified as the most widespread contributor to stream degradation across most of the state. Other sources of pollution are summarized in this article.
Record #:
34196
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission voted to postpone until December a vote on granting the power of eminent domain to the Piedmont Triad Regional Water Authority for acquiring land to construct a regional water supply dam. The Randleman Lake project is to be built in Randolph and Guilford counties to supply the municipalities of Randleman, High Point, Jamestown, Archdale, and Greensboro and Randolph County.
Record #:
34197
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent report published by the North Carolina Division of Environmental Management says that the 1987 phosphate detergent ban has achieved an average forty-eight-percent reduction in wastewater treatment plant effluent phosphorus concentrations. These results are based on twenty-three wastewater treatment plants across the state. The ban is preventing phosphorus from being discharged into the rivers of the state.
Record #:
34195
Author(s):
Abstract:
Legislation ratified by the North Carolina General Assembly in July postpones the date by which the Environmental Management Commission must reclassify water supply watersheds and the date by which local governments must submit local water supply ordinances. A summary of the changes is provided in this article.