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12 results for Water supply--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
17653
Abstract:
Two recent decisions by the North Carolina Supreme Court have focused attention on a growing problem faced by municipal administration: the proper location of water storage tanks. Quite commonly, good engineering practice dictates the location of such facilities. But legal, financial, social, or political problems related to this location may force the city to choose another spot.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 19 Issue 7, Mar 1953, p9-10, Inside back cover
Record #:
17891
Abstract:
The 1965 General Assembly recommended the Department of Water Resources appoint a committee responsible for studying water use legislation and to report back to the assembly in 1967. Such a report was necessary because of a modern, growing population in the state which also forced new laws to deal with increased demand. Findings from the initial report are included in this piece.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 32 Issue 8, May 1966, p18-19, il
Record #:
33583
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Clean Water Loan and Grant Fund of 1987 was created by the General Assembly to provide low-interest loans and some grants to local governments for construction of wastewater and water supply projects. The Division of Environmental Management is accepting applications for a broad range of activities. Details about the program are provided in this article.
Record #:
34175
Author(s):
Abstract:
A conference committee of the North Carolina General Assembly convened on May 21 to consider a bill that would allow the Environmental Management Commission additional time to adopt water supply classifications and management requirements and classify all existing watersheds. The legislature also considered bills that would allow the collection of fees to help support state and local environmental services.
Record #:
34185
Author(s):
Abstract:
In December, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission adopted minimum rules for classification and protection of surface water supplies, as mandated by the Water Supply Watershed Protection Act passed in 1989. The commission must next reclassify all water supply watersheds in the state, and develop ordinances for local governments.
Record #:
34199
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed in June a 1990 District Court’s finding that the Army Corps of Engineers properly considered the permit they issued for construction of the Lake Gaston-Virginia Beach pipeline. The City of Virginia Beach filed another suit in the Eastern District Court of North Carolina seeking to overturn a law passed only days earlier by the North Carolina General Assembly. The recent bill created a new statute mandating certain conditions under which water is withdrawn from any major river or reservoir.
Record #:
34164
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1989 Session of the North Carolina General Assembly considered a host of environmentally related bills and passed a number that could have significant effects on water quantity and quality statewide. Legislation pertain to solid waste, a state water supply plan, watershed classification, stormwater runoff, and erosion control.
Record #:
34222
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina Senate Bill 875 was introduced to correct fragmented, inconsistent and unfair laws on interbasin transfers. Legislators and water resources experts discussed fundamental questions of water rights and the appropriate roles of local and state governments in water resources management at a forum in June. Among discussion were the riparian rights doctrine, economic and ecological issues.
Record #:
34226
Author(s):
Abstract:
At its March meeting, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission denied a request from the Town of Boiling Springs to reclassify a portion of Sandy Run Creek in Cleveland and Rutherford counties for water supply. It was the first time the commission has denied a request for reclassification to water supply purposes.
Record #:
34231
Author(s):
Abstract:
In May, State Superior Court Judge Dexter Brooks reversed a decision by the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission that would allow the Piedmont Triad Regional Water Authority to continue efforts to build a reservoir on the Deep River in Guilford and Randolph counties. The commission voted to appeal the judge’s decision and to issue a certificate granting eminent domain, authorizing water transfer to allow construction of a regional water supply called Randleman Dam.
Record #:
34228
Author(s):
Abstract:
A state law that went into effect last October requires all persons withdrawing one-million gallons per day or more of surface or ground water to register with the North Carolina Division of Water Resources. The new law also requires registration for any transfer of one-million gallons or more between any of the state’s thirty-eight river basins.
Record #:
34236
Author(s):
Abstract:
A decision made in June by the North Carolina Court of Appeals will require the Environmental Management Commission to reconsider its decision to proceed with the controversial Randleman Dam project. This article reviews the Randleman debate, water quality concerns, and the Appeals Court decision.