NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for WNC Magazine Vol. 1 Issue 1, Mar/Apr 2007
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
22373
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Gillette was a famous American stage actor and playwright. Following the death of his wife at age 28, Gillette was aboard a train, some thought seeking relief from depression over his loss, when the train was delayed for five hours in Tryon. He got off, walked about, and fell in love with the place. He later purchased 110 acres on Little Piney Mountain and lived there awhile to regain his health and vitality. Eventually he returned to his career. He is best known for taking one of Sir Arthur Conon Doyle's Sherlock Holmes books and turning it into a stage play. He is also credited with capturing the persona of Holmes complete with deer slayer hat and curved pipe.
Source:
Record #:
22374
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hot Springs is a small mountain town tucked inside Pisgah National Forest in Madison County. Clarke describes some things to do there like visiting the Hot Springs Resort and Spa for a soak--50,000 folks visit it each year; having a bite to eat at the Smoky Mountain Diner; and visiting the Yellow Teapot & Mad Artist shop.
Source:
Record #:
22372
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chase describes the work of Valle Crucis artist Lowell Hayes, whose paintings capture that prebud period between winter and spring in Western North Carolina. He was influenced by Chinese painters whose work captured that period in their country which started his thinking about the same thing happening in his own Appalachian area.
Record #:
22375
Author(s):
Abstract:
All kinds of theories have been put forth over the years to explain the appearance of lights on Brown Mountain near Morganton in Burke County. In attempting to demystify the lights, scientists have developed almost many theories as there are folk legends. However, at the present time the lights remain as mysterious as ever.
Source:
Record #:
22384
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rutherford County's Hickory Nut Gorge encompasses Chimney Rock, a 2,280-foot monolith that towers over the gorge and nearby river and gives scenic views as far as 75 miles. Lucius Morse and his brothers purchased it in 1902, for $5,000 and planned to develop it as a tourist attraction. The park has belonged to the Morse family ever since. Recently the family decided to sell and put a price of $55 million on their property. There were fears among residents that a developer might buy it. However, negotiations between the family and the NC Division of State Parks ended with the state buying it for $24 million.
Source:
Record #:
22383
Abstract:
Tami Moss is director of the Rise and Shine Freedom School, an after-school program held in the Bethel \"A\" Baptist Church in Brevard. The school began ten years ago with twelve children and today has more than fifty. \"The after-school tutoring program is designed to teach youth about justice and civil rights, but participants also come away with an education in their heritage and a sense of who they can become.\" Not one child who has completed the program has dropped out of school.
Source:
Record #:
22380
Author(s):
Abstract:
Happy Valley is located in Polk County and contains the town of Tryon, Saluda, Columbus, and several villages. It is to these small towns in Western North Carolina that tuberculosis sufferers went seeking relief and the avoidance of the larger sanitariums in places like Asheville. Between 1800 and 1950 was the deadliest period of the disease and millions died from it, including the poet Sidney Lanier, who died in Saluda after contracting the disease in a Union Civil War prison camp.
Source:
Record #:
22381
Abstract:
Cashiers is a tiny town in Jackson County in Western North Carolina. Although it has only two traffic lights it is filled with gift shops, restaurants, antique stores, and galleries.
Source:
Record #:
22396
Abstract:
Bluegrass is an integral part of the music history of Western North Carolina. The music has changed very little over the decades, but that has not diminished its popularity. The music still carries the themes of the simple folk and the trials and tribulations they face, as well as harkening back to a time when life was much different. Stith discusses some of the older and the newer, emerging musicians.
Source:
Record #:
22397
Abstract:
Roy Williams, coach of the University of North Carolina's basketball team, reminisces about his roots in Western North Carolina and as coach at North Carolina and Kansas.
Source:
Record #:
22400
Abstract:
The Foothills Equestrian and Nature Center, also known as FENCE, was founded in 1984. Its 400 acres feature \"multiple training and riding grounds, nature trails, stables for 200 horses, and world-class eventing facilities where many competitions are held each year.\" Another endeavor at the center is TROT, or Therapeutic Riding of Tryon, a program that uses riding of trained horses to \"help the disabled lead better lives through the physical benefits gained from a horse's motion and the emotional and mental benefits from touching and caring for an animal.\"
Source:
Record #:
22399
Author(s):
Abstract:
At one time Polk County had a thriving wine industry that produced quality wine between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Once there were twenty-two vineyards; now there are only two. Prohibition and World War II when workers were called up for service put a crimp in the industry. Now two wineries are reviving Polk County's wine tradition--Green Creek Winery in Columbus and Rockhouse Vineyards in Tryon.
Source:
Record #:
22398
Author(s):
Abstract:
Twigs in Blowing Rock which was purchased by brothers David and Doug Beach in 2000. Ben Hollinger, who studied at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY, is the chef.
Source: