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7 results for The State Vol. 52 Issue 3, Aug 1984
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Record #:
8146
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During World War II, eastern North Carolina became the home of several prisoner-of-war camps. Roberson focuses on the Williamston camp, where prisoners began arriving in 1943. Italians prisoners arrived first; however, they were soon moved to Butner. Following the Italians, German prisoners began to arrive. These soldiers had served in North Africa in Rommel's Africa Corps. In Williamston, the prisoners found work filling the labor roles of American men who had been drafted. Labor rules regarding the prisoners were dictated by the Geneva Convention. The Germans were allowed to furnish the camp with gardens and other decorations. They were even allowed to build a recreation building. Friendships between the prisoners and civilians grew and continued following the war. Several of the German soldiers have returned to Williamston to revisit the site of their incarceration as well as to reunite with old friends.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Aug 1984, p4, por
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Record #:
8147
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Samuel D. Bissette, a former bank president, has devoted the last fifteen years to painting. His collection of thirty-five paintings depicting North Carolinian scenes from 1885 - 1910 is set to open as a mobile exhibit in 1984. These watercolors show scenes from all over the state. Financial support came from the Wachovia Corporation, and the Saint John's Museum of Art is arranging the tour. Bissette focuses on showing historical scenes in order to preserve North Carolina history. He predicts that his collection will be of special interest during the millennium celebration in 2000.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Aug 1984, p5, il, por
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Record #:
8149
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Winemaker, Pilippe Jourdain, produced the Biltmore Estate's first grape crop in 1978. Since then, Biltmore vineyards have produced a variety of wines. Currently, 120 acres of commercial grape vineyards are producing 35,000 cases of wine per year. This number is expected to grow to over 100,000 cases per year by 1994. This growth will come with the completion of a 30,000-square-foot, $6.5 million winery. The winery is scheduled to begin construction in September 1984. While production is expected to increase, Mr. Jourdain still focuses on the quality of Biltmore Vineyard's products rather than the quantity.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Aug 1984, p2, por
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Record #:
8152
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The Old Burial Ground in Beaufort contains many grave sites dating to the 18th- and 19th-centuries. Headstone epitaphs provide an interesting look into period culture. Left unattended, the graveyard fell into disrepair, and in 1970, the Beaufort Historical Association sought to have it listed on the National Register of Historic Places. After the graveyard was designated a historic site, the association was able to obtain funds to restore it. Although the graveyard was officially considered full and closed in 1825, burials have occurred in family plots as late as 1980.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Aug 1984, p3, por
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Record #:
8151
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George Washington became the first American to popularize mule breeding. Mules were vital to the late 19th- and early 20th-century southern farming community. While North Carolina was not known for mule breeding, it was known for mule trading. The town of Creedmore, North Carolina, became known as the largest mule trading center in the southeast. G.M. Chappell & Son was a Creedmore mule trading business. This firm processed the trading of over 2,500 mules a year during the 1920s and 1930s.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Aug 1984, p3, por
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Record #:
8148
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Harlan Hall is supervising biologist at the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission's Caswell County Game Lands that includes a forty-acre rehabilitation center that provides a place where wild animals are prepared for return to the wild.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Aug 1984, p2, por
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Record #:
8150
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Bamboo grows well in North Carolina. It works well in flood-prone areas; can be used as a windbreak or bird habitat; and even can be pickled. Although small shoots can sprout up in unwanted areas, it is easy to cut them back.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Aug 1984, p3, por
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