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8 results for The State Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985
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Record #:
8400
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Junius L. Clemmons, a native of Clemmonsville, developed a system of dots and dashes that could be sent through copper wire. Clemmons developed his communications device in 1833 and sent the design to a Mr. Page, who was a professional electrician in Washington, D.C. Clemmons never heard back from Page. In 1837, Clemmons read a newspaper article that told of Samuel Morse and Page creating a telegraph system. Clemmons then discovered that Page worked in the U.S. Patent Office and could not issue a patent to himself. Page, therefore, used his friend, Samuel Morse, and earned a patent to the telegraph. Clemmons wrote an article in the Washington Globe claiming that he was the true inventor of the telegraph. Page admitted receiving Clemmons design, but he denied copying it. Clemmons forgave Page for his betrayal and enjoyed a successful law firm in Kentucky, becoming the oldest practicing lawyer in the nation before his death.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p11, por
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Record #:
8399
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Figure Eight Island, north of Wrightsville Beach, has become a popular resort community. At the turn of the 20th-century, Figure Eight was no more than a brush-covered island. The Foy family purchased much of the island for $200 in 1911. The family retained the property until Hurricane Hazel hit the area in 1954. Dan Cameron began buying land after the hurricane because current property owners wanted to move off the land. In 1971, Cameron sold his property rights to the Figure Eight Development Company. The firm added a new marina and clubhouse on the island. By 1985, lots that sold for $5,000 in 1960 sold for over $225,000. Homeowners on Figure Eight Island are using modern architecture designs that blend homes into the island's natural beauty.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p8-10, il, map
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Record #:
8402
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The Sternberger House was built in Greensboro by Sigmund Sternberger. The house, built in 1926, is considered an outstanding example of Venetian renaissance revival architecture. Located on Summit Avenue, the home is now surrounded by parking lots and highways. Sternberger donated the home to the United Arts Council in Greensboro. After his death in 1963, the council used the home as their home office. Since 1979, rooms in the home have been rented to painters, potters, and writers to provide them with a location to create their works. Several of the home's artists, such as Peter Agostini, have work that is found in such places as the Metropolitan and Museum of Modern Art.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p14, por
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Record #:
8401
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Eastern North Carolina is home to many swamps ranging in size from small wet strips to the magnificent spread of the Great Dismal Swamp. When exploring North Carolina's swamps, one can find a wide variety of plant and animal life. Many swamps contain plant life unique to their areas, but almost all of North Carolina's swamps are home to the majestic cypress tree. Swamp visitors must always take safety precautions from such things as poisonous snakes and plants. With proper precautions, a swamp expedition provides a fascinating adventure.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p12-13, il
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Record #:
8403
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The Cherokee healed their sick with a combination of herbal treatments, invocations to deities, rituals to counteract witchcraft, and limited surgery. Most surgeries consisted of scarification. Tools such as flint arrowheads, turkey leg bones, sucking horns, and blackberry stickers were used to perform surgeries. Herbal medicines such as Joe Pyeweed (Eupatorium) were also used to treat the sick.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p15, il
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Record #:
8406
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Appleton Oaksmith was born in Maine, the son of parents who were to become prominent in the Victorian literary world. Oaksmith left Maine for a life of adventure on the seas and made voyages to China, Panama, Nicaragua, Peru, and the Congo. During the Civil War, he was arrested for slave trading but escaped from jail. He began blockade-running, transporting arms and ammunition to the Confederacy. After the war he became a correspondent for the LONDON GLOBE, covering the Franco-Prussian War. Later he bought land in Beaufort. He invested in the railroad industry and was a member of the North Carolina House of Representatives in 1874. On July 4, 1879, Oaksmith lost three of his children in a boating accident and, he retreated from public life. He died in 1887 and is buried at Hollywood, his Beaufort estate.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p20-22,, il, por
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Record #:
8405
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The bald eagle is making a comeback in North Carolina. Only one eagle was spotted in the state during 1982, compared to thirteen in 1985. A state ban on the pesticide DDT and the eagle's designation as a protected species are reasons for the bird's population growth. Dr. Richard Brown of the Carolina Raptor Center in Charlotte believes the state can do more. One of the biggest dangers to the state's bald eagles is ignorant hunters. Dr. Brown believes that the state should, as some states do, require a bird identification test before granting a gun license. Dr. Brown also advocates a reward system, under which private companies would grant money for any information on illegal hunting practices. Rewards up to $20,000 would provide sufficient motivation in turning over poachers, claims Dr. Brown.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p19, il
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Record #:
8404
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The author recalls his first trip to Mt. Mitchell in 1897. Wilson, who was five years old at the time, made the trip with his older brother and father. On the 1897 trip, the family spent four days visiting different mountain ranges and climbing to their summits. Wilson has returned to Mt. Mitchell many times since then, and even spent his honeymoon there in 1919. Today, the mountain is much easier to reach since roads and automobiles have taken the place of trails and horses.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p16-18, 30, il
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