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4 results for The State Vol. 48 Issue 11, Apr 1981
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Record #:
9156
Abstract:
Thanks to Joffre Lanning Coe, an archaeology professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Town Creek Indian Mount was reconstructed. The site is the state's only prehistoric National Historic Landmark, and looks today as it did 500 years ago when inhabited by Creek Indians. First acquainted with the mound in 1936, Coe has spent much of his life researching and overseeing the restoration of the area. The landmark is now open to the public.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 11, Apr 1981, p22-23, il, por
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Record #:
9153
Author(s):
Abstract:
The earliest documented gold found in North Carolina was a seventeen-pound nugget discovered in Cabarrus County in 1799. An eleven-year-old boy named Conrad Reed made the find, and the gold was valued at $3,600. Until 1825 when vein mining was introduced in North Carolina, most gold mining was haphazard and done by amateurs. By 1891, there were thirty-five active mines in the state, and the Reed Gold Mine in Cabarrus County is now a state historical site.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 11, Apr 1981, p8-10, il
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Record #:
9155
Author(s):
Abstract:
St. John's Masonic Lodge in Wilmington, built in 1804, has housed the St. John's Museum of Art since 1964. Newly added to the museum are the St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church and the Cowan school. The church is a three level galley housing the gallery, and the school has been converted into teaching studios and an administrative loft. The lodge is being renovated and will house the permanent collection.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 11, Apr 1981, p16-17, il
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Record #:
9154
Author(s):
Abstract:
Named after Royal Governor William Tryon, Tryon County was created in 1789 and disbanded in 1778. Because of a boundary dispute, a land survey was done and half the county was found to lie in South Carolina and the county was divided. Although it is not easy to locate ancestors in Tryon County, efforts made by genealogists over the last century have proven fruitful.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 11, Apr 1981, p11-12, 30, il, map
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