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5 results for The State Vol. 46 Issue 3, Aug 1978
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Record #:
9264
Abstract:
Charles Armand Tuffin, Marquis de la Rouerie, was made an American colonel in Philadelphia in 1777. He fought in many battles during the Revolutionary War and enlisted volunteers in North Carolina. He returned to France in 1784. He died of pneumonia and battle wounds received near Saint Malo, France on January 30, 1793. Recently published letters from George Washington and other leading figures of the time show the Marquis to have been well-respected and highly admired. \r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 3, Aug 1978, p14-16, il, por
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Record #:
9263
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Abstract:
Founded by John Andrews Rice in 1933, Black Mountain College operated in Buncombe County town until 1965. The school never had more than fifty or so students, rarely held formal examinations, and allowed students to study as fast or as slowly as they wished. The exit examinations were grueling, but the school attracted some of the finest professors in writing, painting, sculpting, and music. Due to a lack of funding, the school closed in 1965.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 3, Aug 1978, p8-9, 30, il, por
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Record #:
9265
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Abstract:
A program organized by Durham's Council for Creative Arts in Public Schools made it possible for fourth to sixth graders to write poetry and stories, to sculpt, take photographs, to dance, and to sing. Children made pin-hole cameras, took the pictures, and learned darkroom techniques to develop them. An exhibit of their work appeared at the dedication of the new Durham City Hall.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 3, Aug 1978, p16, il
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Record #:
9267
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Abstract:
The Webster Library of Niagara is one of the few buildings still standing in the small town just north of Southern Pines. Originally founded as a resort town, the venture proved unsuccessful and the land was bought by residents to pay back taxes. The library, which has remained the same since its founding in 1912, is maintained by the community. It houses roughly two hundred volumes.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 3, Aug 1978, p18-19, 28, il
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Record #:
9266
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Abstract:
A road show, called the Chautauqua, originated in the small town of Chautauqua, New York. Two dramatic groups were organized to tour the country, usually performing plays with some underlying moral principle. The Chautauqua ultimately became a road show, combining a revival and a county fair. Other fraudulent Chautauquas sprung up, but none was ever as successful or morally conscious as the original.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 3, Aug 1978, p17-18, 31, il
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