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9 results for Black Mountain College (Black Mountain)--History
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Record #:
5553
Abstract:
Founded by John Andrew Rice and five other professors and using borrowed buildings for a campus, Black Mountain College became an innovative experiment in higher education.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 2 Issue 2, 1995, p33-44, por, bibl, f Periodical Website
Record #:
5552
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Established in 1933 and existing for twenty-three years, Black Mountain College, with an enrollment of under 100 even in the best of years, was a bold experiment in education and the arts.
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Record #:
6638
Author(s):
Abstract:
Founded by John Andrew Rice and five other professors and using borrowed buildings for a campus, Black Mountain College became an innovative experiment in higher education. Established in 1933 and existing for twenty-three years, Black Mountain College was small, with an enrollment of under 100 even in the best of years. Campus life differed from that of traditional schools. Everyone, students and staff alike, worked on the college farm or in the kitchen or with construction projects.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p25-26, 29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9263
Author(s):
Abstract:
Founded by John Andrews Rice in 1933, Black Mountain College operated in Buncombe County town until 1965. The school never had more than fifty or so students, rarely held formal examinations, and allowed students to study as fast or as slowly as they wished. The exit examinations were grueling, but the school attracted some of the finest professors in writing, painting, sculpting, and music. Due to a lack of funding, the school closed in 1965.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 3, Aug 1978, p8-9, 30, il, por
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Record #:
15123
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Black Mountain College, founded by Rollins College staff after dissension over teaching methods, is probably the most unusual college in North Carolina. At the present time, workmen engaged in completing Black Mountain's new plant at Lake Eden include faculty members and students.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 41, Mar 1941, p9, 16
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Record #:
19823
Abstract:
Black Mountain College of Black Mountain, North Carolina played prominent roles in modern art, the Beats poetry movement, and as a groundbreaking experiment in sociology. For its 22 years of existence, the college was populated by nonconformists and free thinkers who argued progressive issues of the day through painting, sculpture, music, poetry, and literature. In the liberal and progressive environment of Black Mountain College, women played a prominent role in the development and progression of the college. The women of Black Mountain College listed in the article were interviewed regarding their experiences at the college and how it helped to shape their lives.
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Record #:
21125
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As a Japanese-American from Hawaii, I.S. Nakata was far away from home when he first attended Black Mountain College in 1940. His first experiences with Jim Crow, university studies, and with the continental United States all took place at the college. These experiences were cut short by the United States' entry into World War II, when Nakata was drafted into the Army Air Corp. After being honorably discharged in 1942, he returned to Black Mountain College to finish his studies and married fellow student Alexa McLane.
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Record #:
21124
Abstract:
Black Mountain College was founded by several recently fired professors in 1933 during the Great Depression in a region that did not clamor for a liberal arts college and did not have the economy to support it.
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Record #:
21126
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Abstract:
In this interview with writer and Black Mountain College alum Fielding Dawson, the interviewer meant to only discuss Dawson's recently released The Black Mountain Book. The interview quickly become one not so much about the book, but about Black Mountain College itself and the time that Fielding spent there.
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