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6 results for The State Vol. 44 Issue 8, Jan 1977
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Record #:
9168
Abstract:
Lake Julian near Asheville is a man-made lake created for the Skyland steam electric generating plant. Because of the resultant high water temperature, 6,000 tilapia fish, who are accustomed to warmth, were released into the lake on an experimental basis. Female tilapia brood their eggs in their mouth while their male mate digs a nest. Each then take turns guarding the nest from other fish, such as largemouth bass, which also thrive in the lake. Thus far, the warmed water has not proven a problem for the tilapia, although several fish kills have been observed both in the summer and in the winter.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 8, Jan 1977, p10-11, il
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Record #:
9169
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Abstract:
The beginning of coinage in North Carolina is not entirely clear, but the first copper or brass pieces appeared in the late 17th century. In the early 19th century, coins began to disappear, and the market was inundated with tokens, paper, and other base metals. By 1834, North Carolina was back on the gold standard thanks to the Bechtlers of Rutherford County who minted the country's first gold dollar. North Carolinians began to be featured on currency, including Virginia Dare who appeared on the half-dollar in 1937, Governor Zebulon Vance, and the North Carolina Capitol Building.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 8, Jan 1977, p12-13, 60, il
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Record #:
9170
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Abstract:
The Southern Railway train depot in Greensboro is under a one-year lease with the Carolina Midland Railway. Tom Tedford, an English teacher at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, is president of Carolina Midland, a model railroad club. Most members are adults, some of whom own thousands of dollars worth of equipment.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 8, Jan 1977, p17, il
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Record #:
9167
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County-by-county listing of good news from 1976 includes awards won and new buildings or renovations begun or completed. For example, Elk Park in Avery County got a new fire department and police department and the job market in Lincoln County is steadily improving.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 8, Jan 1977, p8-9, 23-57, il, por
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Record #:
9171
Abstract:
Dr. Walter Reed of Murfreesboro was in Cuba in 1900 and discovered yellow fever to be transmitted by a particular kind of female mosquito, single-handedly abolishing the health threat of the disease. His home in Murfreesboro is set to be restored and used as a Satellite Medical Center. Reed, born in Virginia in 1851, courted and married Emily Lawrence of Murfreesboro. Reed died in 1902.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 8, Jan 1977, p18-19, il, por
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Record #:
9172
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Abstract:
Collards became a staple in the south because it is one of the few vegetables that can survive the cold winters. Some people cook the entire plants and some only the leaves, but mostly they are boiled. Collards received national recognition in 1975 when Ayden held their first annual Collard Festival.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 8, Jan 1977, p21-22, il
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