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7 results for The State Vol. 44 Issue 6, Nov 1976
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Record #:
9125
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Abstract:
The Cleveland County Fair pony races have been run since the fair's inception in 1923, and continue to be run today. Although racing in Charlotte and Raleigh died out, Cleveland County racing is spurred on by today's competitors, children of former jockeys. Three races are held on each Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of the week-long fair, and prizes are given for the first three places.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 6, Nov 1976, p14-15, il
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Record #:
9124
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On May 21, 1840, the Raleigh and Gaston Railroad ran for the first time from Gaston to the newly completed State Capitol building in Raleigh. This article uses excerpts from two 1840 letters between fifteen-year-old Peter Foster and his father to describe the train and the excitement it stirred in the communities.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 6, Nov 1976, p10-13, il
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Record #:
9128
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On October 11, 1896, the E.S. NEWMAN, a three-mast schooner out of Stonington, Connecticut, was caught in heavy storms off the Virginia coast. Captain S.A. Gardiner ordered the ship be beached in the \"Graveyard of the Atlantic,\" and a warning rocket be fired. At the time, Captain Richard Etheridge and his crew, all of whom were black Americans, were at the Pea Island Lifesaving Station, two miles north of the wreck. Although Etheridge had no lifesaving equipment, he and his crew were able to rescue the ten aboard during the dangerous storm currents. Etheridge was born in Dare County in 1842 and was in charge of Pea Island until his death in 1900.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 6, Nov 1976, p19-20, il, por
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Record #:
9127
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Abstract:
Davidson College holds the claim of producing the first X-ray picture in the U.S. Three students, Osmond L. Barringer, Eben Hardie, and Pender Porter, broke into the physics lab and the medical school on January, 12, 1896. They stole cathode tubes and severed a broken finger from a cadaver in order to produce the first picture. It was not until much later the three realized they had made history for their alma mater and turned over the photograph. A picture of this X-ray appears in the December, 1976, issues of THE STATE.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 6, Nov 1976, p18, 28
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Record #:
9129
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Abstract:
The new Cleveland County Historical Museum in Shelby is housed in the old courthouse building, built in 1907. The museum opened on May 8, 1976, and has nine rooms, each depicting an historic time for the county. The equipment used by John R. Logan, the original surveyor of Shelby, is located in the center of the building. The museum is free and open to the public.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 6, Nov 1976, p22, il
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Record #:
9126
Author(s):
Abstract:
A. B. Houtz & Sons, Inc., of Elizabeth City manufactures more than 90 percent of all rollers used in the U.S. Preceding the wheel, wooden rollers were used in the construction of the ancient pyramids as well as Stonehenge. Today's rollers are made from blackgum trees, which can withstand the heaviest of loads, and are used in a variety of applications.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 6, Nov 1976, p17-18, il
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Record #:
9130
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Abstract:
This article is a reprint of a 1963 memo relating a four-year acquaintance between the author and Thomas Wolfe. Written at the request of author Andrew Turnbull, who was writing Wolfe's biography, passages of the memo appear in Turnbull's book. The memo is reprinted here in its entirely for the interested readership of THE STATE.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 6, Nov 1976, p23-25, il, por
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