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4 results for The State Vol. 44 Issue 10, Mar 1977
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Record #:
9590
Author(s):
Abstract:
A two hundred mile stretch of trail ran from Paint Rock bordering Tennessee to the Saluda Gap on the edge of South Carolina. Because seventy miles of the trail was difficult to travel, especially for cattle, a new road from the Saluda Gap to the Tennessee line was purposed in 1827. This became known as the Buncombe Turnpike, and it increased business greatly and lifted the economy of western North Carolina. By the 1870s, the railroad began moving west, and the stock driving was replaced by the more lucrative transport of corn and other cash crops.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 10, Mar 1977, p9-11, il
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Record #:
9592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Susan Dougal of New Bern is one of the few expert calligraphers in the country. In her early years, she learned a dozen different styles of calligraphy with Sheila Waters, the only American member of the London Society of Scribes and Illuminators. Dougal's work can command as much as $750 for a single certificate. While she lived in Washington, D.C., she did work for the government and for the White House. Since coming to North Carolina, however, she is finding minimal demand for her art.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 10, Mar 1977, p16-17, il
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Record #:
9593
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is the second of a two-part article about Carry Amelia Moore Nation's 1907 visit to North Carolina. Sadly, the DURHAM HERALD censored many of her comments, claiming they were too harsh for print. However, she did tour Raleigh with a reporter from the RALEIGH TIMES, who was able to accurately report her speech while in Raleigh.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 10, Mar 1977, p19-21, il, por
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Record #:
9591
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1916, Thomas Wolfe joined the Dialectic Literary Society at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Although often late or absent from meetings, his work in oration can be seen in the rhetoric he employed in his novels. Although Wolfe remained a member throughout his college career, he became more involved in the campus newspaper during his senior year, and his literary society activities suffered.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 10, Mar 1977, p12-13, 22, il, por
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