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7 results for The State Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976
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Record #:
9111
Author(s):
Abstract:
The centennial of the signing of the Declaration of Independence was observed in Philadelphia in 1876. Although many Southern states still felt resentment toward the North following the Civil War, the Ladies Memorial Association of Wake County decided to provide a flag to the celebration. Raising the necessary funds, the women commissioned Reverend Johannes Adam Simon Oertel to design the flag. The front, of which only one known photograph survives, consisted of the allegorical figures of liberty and prosperity in the center bordered by white oak and holly. The back, of which no picture exists, was an emblematic description of the Old North State. Although the flag was displayed until 1943, it has since been misplaced and efforts to locate it have proven futile.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p12-13, 16, il
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Record #:
9112
Author(s):
Abstract:
By 1700, ships from the New England Whaling Fleet took advantage of beached whales along North Carolina's coast, using the carcasses to make oil. By 1885, a town of over 500 people lived in Lookout Woods, later called Diamond City, chiefly to whale live specimens. Most of the whales killed were Right Whales, yielding an average of 200 barrels of oil each. Due to a decreased number of whales swimming off the coast, whaling in North Carolina ended around 1899.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p14-16, il
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Record #:
9109
Abstract:
Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest in the Nantahala National Forest in western North Carolina is virtually untouched. Home of an impressive collection of the oak-chestnut trees, a virtually extinct species today, Joyce Kilmer Forest is truly a sight to behold. Deer, bear, fox, and bobcat live there, and the Civilian Conservation Corps laid countless forest trails through the woods for visitors.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p8-10, il
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Record #:
9114
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Abstract:
Recently, the gravesite of Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr., was discovered. Spaight signed the U.S. Constitution and served as the first native-born North Carolina governor. He died in 1802, and his son, Richard, Jr., also served as governor and is buried in the same small cemetery as his father. The graveyard is located on Brice's Creek Road in New Bern, and the overgrowth has been cleared by a local Boy Scout Troop.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p20-21, il, por
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Record #:
9110
Author(s):
Abstract:
Del Cameron of Pinehurst, who became the 19th harness-racing driver to be inducted into the Living Hall of Fame of the Trotter at Goshen, New York, trains trotters and pacers to race the Grand Circuit. Cameron has won over 1,200 races and $4.25 million as a driver. Today, Cameron and his son Gary run their own business, training forty horses, nine of which are their own.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p10-11, 59, il
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Record #:
9115
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Rhododendron Festival was held in Asheville every year from 1928 through 1942 until the start of the Second World War. The week-long festival consisted of five parades, three balls, a pageant, tours, exhibitions, an amateur tennis championship, and boxing matches. Although the festivals drew people from across the country and were wildly successful, no interest has been made in reviving them.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p22-23, 66, il
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Record #:
9113
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas Wolfe went to England in 1924, the first of four extended trips he made there. Most of his LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL was written in London and Oxford, and since the publishing of his journals in 1970, it is now possible to follow his trek through England. While in Chelsea, Wolfe often wrote 3,000 words a day of his novel. In 1927, Wolfe tired of England and went to Germany which he much preferred.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p17-18, il
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